Mixed In Key - Worth The Money?

AJ RUFF

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#1
I was thinking about buying mixed in key to help me with planning my sets, do you think that it is worth the money, or is there any other software that does a good job which is cheaper, or even free?
 

Saint

Buried Audio
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#3
I havent personally got it but i know a few people who do and it really is a fantastic program.

If youre interested then it will most probably be worth it for you.

As for alternatives, there might well be and someone else might to be able to advise you better on that.
 

Fallen.GeMiNi

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#4
Mixed in key is cool when you start. Obviously your ears are the only thing you should completely rely on. But if you are mixing for a short time or you don't have much experience playing out, it is handy and could help you out a bit. Later on you won't be needing it so much or not at all :)
 

ONSLAUGHT88

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#5
Yeah man, use your ears, it's easier and cheaper but maybe not quicker, you got too find those mixes lol

Chemical records has this key wheel thing, this may help you out -

Mixing music has never been so much fun.... ever wondered how a lot of big DJs create mixes and mash ups that sound too good to be true? By mixing tracks that are in the same or related keys, harmonic mixing enables long blends and perfect mash-ups. The goal is to eliminate those nasty key clashes.

Simply click on the Camelot key reference next to the track title in the list above and the Chemical database will show you key match suggestions, even for tracks you already have in "your collection" (you need to be logged in to use this function and you need to have either bought "your collection" from Chemical Records using your account log in or manually enter other tracks into "your collection")

You can also buy commercial software to give key data for your mp3's on your computer for this we recommend Mixed In Key.

Disclaimer: BPM & Key results shown here are not always 100% accurate (but they are not that far off) Please do not buy tracks based on the key or bpm from our results as we can not guarantee them to be correct, it is a guide only.

Mixed In Key LLC owns the full copyrights and trademarks for the Camelot system and all related assets. All rights reserved. Copyright (C) 2008. All Key and BPM information has been generated by Chemical Records' own software systems and Chemical Records owns the full copyrights for the information generated. All rights reserved. Copyright (C) 2008.


Guess your tunes need to be on their site unless you know the key.
 
D

dirty breaks

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#8
Thanks for the replies, I do try to use my ears as much as possible, however they are not musically trained so sometimes im wrong.
then train them. get piano lessons and learn about music and how it is made, actually be wiling to go beyond fading between two songs playing at the same speed.
 

lostnthesound

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#9
If you have a large library of music and/or samples that are missing the key/beat information, this is a great program.

I would agree with the previous posts in that it's good to train your ears first as it will help in the long term with your musical abilities. However, for those of us who have been collecting digital tracks and/or converting vinyl collection for many years and have amassed HUGE track libraries, labeling by ear/piano key can quickly become a pain in the ass when sorting through 6000+ tracks.

Key metadata can also be stored, making it extremely useful for programs like Traktor/Serato. To add, its BPM matching is quite good and you can specify whether to have the BPM in decimals (and by how many places) as well as having the BPM round up to the nearest number...which can be embedded in the metadata (or filename) as well.

I don't use the BPM unless it's for labeling samples that are missing data. However, the key labeling can be a life saver when it counts.

It's a great product worth the cost of admission, and their customer service is fast in getting back to you. For under $100, I'm happy with it.

Cheers.
 
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Ozmatic

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#10
Virtual DJ also specifies the key from an audio track, now i dont want to suggest how to get virtual dj as its banned but please dont buy it ;D
 

T:M

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#12
Lol do what onslaught has suggested, been getting key info there for a while now. As for how good it works I'm still on the fence.
 

Agent Smith

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#15
not a massive fan of this.
I know someone who religiously uses it and is very critical if you don't mix up or down keys like it says.

You have 2 ears for a reason. USE EM.
 

Jwood27

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#17
if you are remotely musical surely when you hear tunes you automatically think ahh shit i bet that sounds really good with such and such a tune, your brain does it naturally you just need to know all your tunes and how they sound..
part and parcel of being a dj imo
 

Agent Smith

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#19
if you are remotely musical surely when you hear tunes you automatically think ahh shit i bet that sounds really good with such and such a tune, your brain does it naturally you just need to know all your tunes and how they sound..
part and parcel of being a dj imo
^^ never a truer word spoken.
 

Mish Mash

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#20
Ears are the way to do it, and just try to imagine how mixes would sound in your head. And all this mix in key stuff only really makes a difference if you're playing two tunes that have high pitch melodies in them. Which normally sounds pretty bad even if they are in key...
 
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