Decent beginner decks?

JoeCarlse

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#1
What are some decent beginner decks, not for gigging or anything, just literally for home use to get good on?

Im talking like not much over £100 if possible?
 

rysk

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#3
£100 won't get you anything except a pair of crappy and probably broken numark turntables..i made the same mistake.

then i went and made the same mistake by buying a pair of their CDJ's
 

danwell

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#4
i'll her you out mate but honestly, when it comes to dj equipment, buy once and save money in the long run. beg steal or borrow money if you have to. get yourself a pair of technics 1210's or some pioneer cdj's and you wont go wrong. there are no beginner kits. they all do the same thing. the above do it better.
 

ScottyEightSix

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#6
A lot of people are going to hit you with the same thing Danwell did.

On a more realistic note not everyone can afford £500 for a set of second hand technics for a hobby they may not even stick at.

I started on a pair of Numark TT1510s (belt drives) I would definately not recomend going for something like that they made even the simplest of things like cueing up a nightmare... however, if you go for something along the lines of a pair of TT165s or possibly the TT200s (if you can afford them) they will do you just fine. You will probably be able to get a mixer thrown in and some cheap headphones which is all you need while you are grasping the basics.

Bear in mind if you go for the cheaper options now you will more than likely one day want to upgrade to a set of Technics as they are the industry standard for a reason however, you will only be able to sell them at a fraction of the price as they do not maintain their value anywhere near as well as a set of Technics.
 

danwell

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#9
Yeah that's why I said til you can afford them. Sam the Dnb man gave me his old belt drives and lent me a few tunes and it put me off if I'm honest. Then I bought some technics and I've mixed pretty much every day since then.

But anyway. As has been said, stick with virtual dj til you can find some semi decent cdjs.
 

dj_merlin

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#10
Yeah that's why I said til you can afford them. Sam the Dnb man gave me his old belt drives and lent me a few tunes and it put me off if I'm honest. Then I bought some technics and I've mixed pretty much every day since then.

But anyway. As has been said, stick with virtual dj til you can find some semi decent cdjs.
Words of wisdom from Danwelleth
 

Teddy

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#11
to be brutally honest with u.
my advice would be to get whatever you can afford, give it a go and get it out of your system without spunking too much money.

normally i wouldn't advise this but you sound like everyone else i've know that wanted to try it and then gave it up shortly after. hey i could well be wrong but thats the impression i get.

ur other threads stink of this attitude.
who makes money out of making tunes
who rates mainstream djs

no offence but i would ask yourself what you want to get out of dj'ing/producing and go from there. if ur passionate about it. go high end equipment, dj finance sites can help spread the cost.

2nd hand budget decks £100 + £20 budget mixer + cables, headphones, extension lead, amp speakers, possibly need replacment needles/carts too. some of which u may already have.

2nd hand technics £350 upwards... slightly better mixer £100

2nd hand cdj's... not really sure... still quite expensive tho, depending on quality.

personally i think u might be better off with a budget dj controller and use it with trackor or virtual dj
 
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#12
I vote

Traktor + a midi controller

Because:
It can teach you almost everything you need to know (as long as you don't use the waveform, auto gain and sync button etc).

Its cheap.

Bare easy to record a mix everytime you do it which is extremely important imo.

Takes up less space

Easy to set up for 3 or 4 decks if you ever want to go down that route


The things you tend to miss out on are learning to order your cd wallet and gaining tunes is a bit different. Definitely worth getting some cdjs before you play out purely to get used to them, but you can pretty much jump from midi straight on to a pair of decks if you've actually practiced well. There are always small differences with how you cue tunes and eqs on different mixers and stuff but it doesn't take long to adjust.

Saying that mixing vinyl is 1000 times more fun
 
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