Logic question - plug-in order on a channel strip

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#2
Wow.... i mean...it depends on what plugins you are using but basically it changes everything....
Example:
Reverb>Disto>Chorus>Comp

The disto will be applied on the initial sound plus on its reverb. And so on. The comp will affect the initial sound plus its reverb plus its disto plus its chorus.

In fact it's a serial application.

If now you take the same pluggins but do:

Disto>Comp>Reverb>Chorus

the comp will handle the disto. the reverb will be affected only by the chorus. The chorus will be affected by nothing, being the end of the processing chain.

simple one:

Disto>reverb

your sound will be distorted and then a reverb will be apllied

Reverb>Disto

your sound will get reverb, which will be distorted as much as the initial sound.

It's essential to understand that every time you ad a pluggin, it affects the sound the last pluggin was giving on its output.

You must try some things to understand. Bypass some pluggins etc....

Have fun
 

sam the dnb man

Variation
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#3
It is like circuitry so it is very important if you are going for a distictive sound.
For example:
If you where to hi pass a sound first with a steep curve at 100hz then was to add a guitar amp emulation to it after with a certain setting you would end up getting frequencies emitting below 100hz.
 

kama

benkama.net
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#5
The basic example is, use a long reverb or a delay first, then do a heavy compression after that. You'll hear how the delay want's to fade away but the compressor keeps squishing the sound to the surface, until it fades under the treshold and suddenly goes quiet.

So yes. it's very important.

---------- Post added at 21:10 ---------- Previous post was at 21:07 ----------

And oh, even in menial tasks like EQing and compressing it does matter.

For example you compress a break to bring quiet hits up a bit. Then you think that the kick has too much BOOM in it and add an EQ after the compressor. This way you can cut the compressed signal out of it's bottom and if the boom was very heavy, the compressor will still be set off by the kick but you cant hear it since the boom is cut after the comp. Then again if you first cut off the boom (EQ before comp), the compressor wont react to the boom since it's not there when the signal comes into it - you've already cut it off before that.
 
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