This might sound like a dumb question.......

Junglist_007

learning difficulties
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#2
This is the info i learnt from. Hope it helps you out like it did me:

Finding the "mixing point".... well theres no singular mixing "point" in a track..... its just every 16 bars is the start of a new sequence therefore this is the ideal place to let go of your record and start mixing it......

so what this means...... the first kick is the start of the sequence (or phrase as you strangely put it).... the first snare is one beat after the start of the sequence...... then the second kick is in between the start of the third beat and the start of the fourth..... and the last snare is on the last beat......... this repeats 15 more times..... to a total of 16....... this is then the end of a sequence..... at this point the tune will change in some way....... at the start of this you start your mix.....

this is also the standard writing point that most dnb peeps start with when writing a dnb track.... they usually start with this sort of drum loop.....

typical tempo is between 172bpm and 180bpm..... most dnb tracks are written around and about 174bpm.... most tunes when mixed are around the 178-180bpm mark...
 

RocksteadyUK

SkimoBeats
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#3
This is the info i learnt from. Hope it helps you out like it did me:

Finding the "mixing point".... well theres no singular mixing "point" in a track..... its just every 16 bars is the start of a new sequence therefore this is the ideal place to let go of your record and start mixing it......

so what this means...... the first kick is the start of the sequence (or phrase as you strangely put it).... the first snare is one beat after the start of the sequence...... then the second kick is in between the start of the third beat and the start of the fourth..... and the last snare is on the last beat......... this repeats 15 more times..... to a total of 16....... this is then the end of a sequence..... at this point the tune will change in some way....... at the start of this you start your mix.....

this is also the standard writing point that most dnb peeps start with when writing a dnb track.... they usually start with this sort of drum loop.....

typical tempo is between 172bpm and 180bpm..... most dnb tracks are written around and about 174bpm.... most tunes when mixed are around the 178-180bpm mark...

hahahah! copy and pasted my explanation!! hahaha... thats plagerism!!! haha...


but yeh thats how it goes bro..... give me a PM if any of that needs explaining....

got a "how to DJ" post on the go at the min.... will post when its fully complete....

nice one.....
 

DJHaze

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#4
hahahah! copy and pasted my explanation!! hahaha... thats plagerism!!! haha...


but yeh thats how it goes bro..... give me a PM if any of that needs explaining....

got a "how to DJ" post on the go at the min.... will post when its fully complete....

nice one.....
he did say it was where he learnt from.

should have given some cred to rock tho g!
 

Greg P

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#6
Also if you're just learning there's a book out by a guy called Bill Brewster which is called How To DJ (Properly), you'll find it in Waterstones HMV etc...

It's pretty good and quite comprehensive, it came out a bit late for me, but I'd reccomend it to anyone starting out...
 

RocksteadyUK

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#9
Also if you're just learning there's a book out by a guy called Bill Brewster which is called How To DJ (Properly), you'll find it in Waterstones HMV etc...

It's pretty good and quite comprehensive, it came out a bit late for me, but I'd reccomend it to anyone starting out...
Never read it.... but alot of people big it up.... so go grab a copy mate..... good investment!
 

dizzzeejungle

Junglist Down Under..
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#11
What do you mean by "most tracks are around 174 bpm, but when mixed are usually 178-180bmp"

Don't you just start your first record with the pitch adjustment on zero and then you match the next record with this tempo that has already been set?
 

perspective

Sausage Rolls
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#12
What do you mean by "most tracks are around 174 bpm, but when mixed are usually 178-180bmp"

Don't you just start your first record with the pitch adjustment on zero and then you match the next record with this tempo that has already been set?
Depends how fast you want your mix to be, you can start off at any tempo you want and work with that, or bump up/down the tempo of certain tracks to raise/lower the pace of the whole mix.

You don't have to mix at the same tempo for the whole of your mix, i've heard some clever ones where the drops and breaks have been timed so that the dj can raise the tempo for a few songs, then lower it back down again, although tbh that has only been in trance and hardcore/freeform, never heard it done in dnb.
 

Sub-junkie

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#13
just practice man thats the only advice I can give you.....you will feel when you start to hit the good mixes....but be patient man cos it takes a long time to get any good.
 

Greg P

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#14
What do you mean by "most tracks are around 174 bpm, but when mixed are usually 178-180bmp"

Don't you just start your first record with the pitch adjustment on zero and then you match the next record with this tempo that has already been set?
Nope, I generally have my decks at about +3...

Most DJ's play everything pitched up just a little, just give it a bit more urgency...
 
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