Question: Getting a vintage "break" sound

tv_g

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VIP Junglist
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Jun 25, 2004
Location
LA
can you post an example?

if by vintage you mean lo-fi:
resample at a lower bit rate (8 to 16 kHz for example) with aliasing turned off, run through a slight room verb or convolution, apply a mild distortion with soft noise, possibly mono the file.
 

Labrat

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Jul 12, 2009
Location
Melbourne, Australia
i think a lot of breaks need very subtle eq's mainly subtractive.
a lot of the oldschool sound and sound people want is the sound of the akais or emu samplers, you can get some sick crunch of them both (never used an akai s...)
if you dont have hardware that gets a crunch by just using it and turning up the volume you can use compressors and distortion and dynamic tools but it should be that much effort ;)

also start with the highest possible quality you can for your samples. helps a lot
 

Innovine

Active Member
Joined
Dec 28, 2008
Location
sweden
emulate the real process: old recordings of acoustic drums playing the break at low bpm. Use Superior Drummer or BFD or something like that. Add a bit of scratchy vinyl noise, crackly dirt plugins, eq off the bottom end a bit. Speed it up to 175bpm. Add mild distortion, compression, and bit reduction, over and over again, chop off any tails, more compression and just keep at it. This simulates the hundreds of times its been sampled and resampled before it ended up on that loopmasters cd that everyone downloaded. Add more compression, just like a CM tutorial. Keep compressing it until all you have is a piece of white noise that goes kssk. Now listen to it on your shitty ipod earbuds and you are sorted.
 
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