Liquid Kicks...

Discussion in 'Production' started by Fckthwrld, Mar 6, 2015.

  1. Fckthwrld

    Fckthwrld New Member

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  2. chris438lee

    chris438lee New Member

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    Hmmm that was a good example, but the kick sounds really boomy and nice low end so all I could say is that he used saturation to fatten it up. But eq it and he mightve used sidechain which can help your kick stand out
     
  3. saganspirit

    saganspirit Member

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    Frequency separation + gentle sidechain.
     
  4. chris438lee

    chris438lee New Member

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    Question what do you mean Frequency Separation?
     
  5. saganspirit

    saganspirit Member

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    Apologies, generally in dnb the sub end of the frequencies is taken up by the bass (sub 60ish hz) and the kick should be above this (thus separated). All done via EQ. It's a pretty subjective topic though. There's a ton of info on youtube about EQ as well.
     
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  6. Know One

    Know One Living A Lie

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    Kicks have always been a pain for me as well.... I spend far more time messing with kicks than I do snares or even breaks. I'm always second guessing myself in the kick area, with dnb that is.
     
  7. Yukon

    Yukon Yukon

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    I think you might be too hung up on trying to achieve a certain sounding kick rather than just going with what ever vibe you got going. It's better to have drums that suit the tune rather than ones you want imo. I find spending too long on one element slows my creative process for the rest.
    Liquicity uploads for a while now actually aren't the best examples of liquid either. Seem's he's trying to push a fredv/gfx c&k copycat thing...
     
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  8. Mania

    Mania i fukin wot m8

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    Find the right samples? know how to layer if you need to? theres not much to it really
     
  9. Fckthwrld

    Fckthwrld New Member

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    Okay, i bought some decent sample packs (Nu Tone, London Electricity). Are there any good tutorials you know on how to layer them? I really dont know how i should layer and process them.
     
  10. chris438lee

    chris438lee New Member

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    Highs and low my friend take a nice beefy low end kick and roll off the high end then find a nice click in another kick and roll off low then pitch it to you liking also play with the length of both kick.
     
  11. Fckthwrld

    Fckthwrld New Member

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    Okay i think i got that going. One more question, and i hope its not too stupid. If i layer 2-3 samples its way to loud, my master bus turns red. Should i just make the whole track of the samples quieter? Im not really into mixing yet (as you can guess)
     
  12. saganspirit

    saganspirit Member

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    Use separate tracks for each sample - more control.
     
  13. Know One

    Know One Living A Lie

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    What I've been finding that helps a lot is insuring the two kicks your layering are the same key.... so you'll need to pitch one up or down to be the same key as the other. Layering kicks seem to go much smoother for me if I make sure the two (or three) kicks are close to each other in key as I can get them. Just some advice as to what I've been doing, I'm no kick layer expert or anything. As I stated above, I struggle with kicks myself at times. Also, laying them in audio helps to see your transients much better. Once you got it layer nice and bounced down to one kick, then you can throw it into midi if that's your normal method of drum making.