Filter vs an Eq

Discussion in 'Production' started by Krispy, Feb 4, 2010.

  1. Krispy

    Krispy Member

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    Perhaps im a bit confused about something here... But what would the difference be between adding a high pass filter or doing a high pass eq?

    Isn't the filter filtering out everything and letting the high notes pass? Where an eq with the same parameters would essentially be doing the same thing? I seem to have this mixed up for some reason
     
  2. richie_stix

    richie_stix gomby plz

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    are you talking about the difference between say, a low pass and a low cut... cos they are almost 'opposite', ie they will keep the low and cut the top or keep the top and cut the low (respectivly)...
     
  3. luciduk

    luciduk Active Member

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    if you use a filter it will have a dead cut off point, like nothing under say 200hz could get through,

    where as with equalizers, it will round it off, so as opposed to a dead cut off point the frequencys fade away around the 200hz point, it is not to a point, BUT you can customize your sound a great deal more

    im not sure i have answered your problem im just explaining the difference between using a filter and an equalizer to high pass a sound
     
  4. motion audio

    motion audio Active Member

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    A high pass filter is basicly a form of shelving EQ, you set a frequency, and everything below that (in the case of a HPF) is completely cut out, whereas with a shelving filter you have the option of boosting it aswell as cutting.
     
  5. logikz

    logikz I Am Not The King Staff Member

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    no difference, if you can automate the high or low shelf on your eq you got a pretty sweet filter, like the waves req for instance. its a very smooth sounding filter
     
  6. Protoplasym

    Protoplasym Nuskool

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    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Equalization

    As you can see, they are of the same blood. Filters are EQs... albeit specialized for certain tasks.

    "A pass filter attenuates either high or low frequencies while allowing other frequencies to pass unfiltered. A high-pass filter modifies a signal only by taking out low frequencies; a low-pass filter only modifies the audio signal by taking out high frequencies. A pass filter is described by its cut-off point and slope. The cut-off point is the frequency where high or low-frequencies will be removed. The slope, given in decibels per octave, describes a ratio of how the filter attenuates frequencies past the cut-off point (eg. 12 dB per octave). A band-pass filter is a combination (in series) of one high-pass filter and one low-pass filter which together allow only a band of frequencies to pass, attenuating both high and low frequencies past certain cut-off points.

    Shelving-type equalizers increase or attenuate the level of a wide range of frequencies by a fixed amount. A low shelf will affect low frequencies up to a certain point and then above that point will have little effect. A high shelf affects the level of high frequencies, while below a certain point, the low frequencies are unaffected."


    You simply have to know 'what' you want to be taken away/added Frequency wise... that, and have a feel for the 'sound' that the specific EQ/Filter is going to add to your Audio by way of it's own personal color whether it's Software or Hardware based.


    :hope that helps:
     
  7. Krispy

    Krispy Member

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    So an EQ will basically eliminate frequencies outside of a certain range, where a filter will allow some of them to pass through to an extent but sound filtered?
    I think..........?!
     
  8. groelle

    groelle Well-Known Member

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    no. and filter will also let some through, depending on your settings. basicly a filter is an eq which is set for filtering, nothing else.. all of the rest depends on your settings.
     
  9. MARLZTAH

    MARLZTAH ++DuB PrOFesSoR++

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    what he said ^

    a basic filter is generally just a very simple, one band EQ, set for filtering out frequencys above, below, or either side of your defined frequency.... or in the case of a notch filter, it will filter out the defined frequency and leave everything else

    the term 'filter', just means 'to take away'.... something most (if not every) EQ can do

    heres some examples of the types of filtering & shelving (using an EQ!)

    High pass filter
    [​IMG]

    Low pass filter
    [​IMG]

    Band pass filter
    [​IMG]

    Notch filter
    [​IMG]

    Low shelving
    [​IMG]

    High shelving
    [​IMG]


    In the example below... low pass @ about 60 Hz (1).... slight boost @ about 600Hz (4).... slight cut at about 1500Hz (5)... and +6db high shelving @ about 6000Hz (7)
    [​IMG]
     

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