Drum layering - How?

Discussion in 'Production' started by FullRinse, Aug 20, 2009.

  1. FullRinse

    FullRinse New Member

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    Hi guys,

    Im using Logic and I get the basics of drum layering, but using Exs24 seems so slow- I'm currently loading 3+ instances per Drum sound, and flicking between them all adjusting adsr etc, also copying the midi data between the tracks and generally taking far too long.

    Is there a sampler that is more drum layer friendly? I've heard mixed reviews of battery, but does this let you load up layers and adjust each layer seperately

    I know I could use the first method and bounce down the hits but I would like the flexibility of tweakage, and a faster workflow.

    How do you layer your sounds?

    any tips?
     
    Last edited: Aug 20, 2009
  2. T Leaf

    T Leaf Neighbourhood Sickhead

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    instead of adjusting each drums adsr, couldn't you just compress them in the same buss? just a thought. i dont use logic though. i mean if its punch you are looking for adsr is the most accurate way, but if all else fails you can comp them together.
     
  3. T Leaf

    T Leaf Neighbourhood Sickhead

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    also, couldn't bounce a good layered up drum sound down to one audio file?
     
  4. MrWoggles

    MrWoggles Member

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    First of all, don't layer unless you have to.

    Personally I like to work with individual hits as opposed to chopping breaks though i'm getting into that more and more.

    Anyway, say i've got a nice sounding punchy snare and a lower one with a bit of trail. I'll assign each of these to it's own mixer channel and EQ them individually, then level the sounds to the point where i've got a balance of sounds.

    If there is a quicker way about it then somebody let me know, I assign every sound to its own mixer buss, always.
     
  5. TongueFlap

    TongueFlap Flappin'

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    Use all audio, its soooooo much easier, you can see where everything is. layer is done by just having different tracks with your different breaks, kicks, snares and so on in them.
    ps... if you like using the samplers then use the ultrabeat! thats what its there for.
     
  6. deadaelus

    deadaelus Laughter in the Slaughter

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    Find the break loop you wanna use, and build individual drum hits over top of it. It will sound really messy if you layer 2 or three drum loops over each other unless you are really good at using groove templates and midi slicing :teeth:


    The drum sampler in logic is the cats meow, give it some time, and love it will come around!
     
  7. TongueFlap

    TongueFlap Flappin'

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    I normally use about 4 breaks over each over, but i EQ alot, so i can specify what i wanna hear
     
  8. T Leaf

    T Leaf Neighbourhood Sickhead

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    also when layering (if this is your thing)

    make sure each transient, of that particular drum type, aligns for a crisp tight attack curve. adsr'ing each sample wont do it on its own. you will need to manually shift them all into the correct space (im talking at least 0.2ms accurate here) you will hear it when two or more samples are correctly aligned.
     
  9. Protoplasym

    Protoplasym Nuskool

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    Layering is an artform. With that in mind: sometimes all it takes is one sample and bam, there's the SD... same with KDs.

    Take making a SD out of multiple SDs:

    1. You can start with one that has a big bottom (for a SD), say, in the 130-160 KH range, and add another one that has bite in the mid 3-500 KH range.

    If you find a snare that you enjoy the high range of, but don't want it's bottom, then HP it... and vice versa. You could take a snare with hardly any Decay that has a real hard smack and layer it with something that has a slow attack and a lot of release.

    When making a snare that "hangs", you could try running it through some verb or delay.

    Honestly, the only thing I ever layer are SDs... I usally find a KD that sits in the mix well and does the job I'm wanting (as long as it hits hard enough and not too much, and fills the frequencies I want it to fill), I'm happy.

    I never layer hats.


    As cliche as it sounds: experimentation is key and at the end of the day, the two things that will show you the way are your EARS (first and foremost) with the help of a trusty Spectrum Analyzer.





    enjoy and have fun:D