Tutorial - Using Linear Phase EQ On Snares (Tip From MakO)

JimpaDirt

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#3
Nice vid! ...but now I'm kinda wondering what is the difference between a regular EQ and a linear-phase EQ exactly? I mean, you say it 'sounds different' but I'm just curious what it does more specifically.

I've heard about it, and seen it in my list of plugins but I've never experimented with it before.
 

miszt

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#4
Nice vid! ...but now I'm kinda wondering what is the difference between a regular EQ and a linear-phase EQ exactly? I mean, you say it 'sounds different' but I'm just curious what it does more specifically.

I've heard about it, and seen it in my list of plugins but I've never experimented with it before.
non linear EQ creates distortion by introducing a phase shift in frequencies, in a non-linear manner, so one frequency may shift by 0.002m, and another 0.01m, which means the waves start to overlap, it can result in cancellation (silence) or significant resonance (ringing) between frequencies, this happens across the spectrum, but sub is the most likley place you will notice it at first because of the long wavelengths. If two peaks overlap, they will resonate, ring out, if a peak and a trough overlap, they can cancel each other out and cause silence or reduced amplitude/volume.

A linear phase EQ, removes this problem, there is still a phase shift, but all the frequencies are calculated to have the same phase shift (a linear phase shift across the spectrum), which means that relative to one another, all the frequencies are still in the same phase as they where pre-processing - linear phase also introduces a slight delay/latency, because of the phase calculations, sometimes this is a pre-delay, so things get shifted backwards, sometimes post, so the delay extends after the sound, the timing is minuscule, and how much you notice it depends on the EQ, it can be quite a pleasing sound

Sometimes non linear phase distortion from EQ's can be musical, there are many EQ's which 'color' sound in this way and it sounds great, but sometimes it is not good at all, sub being one of the biggest problem areas.
 
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D-Jhepz

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#9
non linear EQ creates distortion by introducing a phase shift in frequencies, in a non-linear manner, so one frequency may shift by 0.002m, and another 0.01m, which means the waves start to overlap, it can result in cancellation (silence) or significant resonance (ringing) between frequencies, this happens across the spectrum, but sub is the most likley place you will notice it at first because of the long wavelengths. If two peaks overlap, they will resonate, ring out, if a peak and a trough overlap, they can cancel each other out and cause silence or reduced amplitude/volume.

A linear phase EQ, removes this problem, there is still a phase shift, but all the frequencies are calculated to have the same phase shift (a linear phase shift across the spectrum), which means that relative to one another, all the frequencies are still in the same phase as they where pre-processing - linear phase also introduces a slight delay/latency, because of the phase calculations, sometimes this is a pre-delay, so things get shifted backwards, sometimes post, so the delay extends after the sound, the timing is minuscule, and how much you notice it depends on the EQ, it can be quite a pleasing sound

Sometimes non linear phase distortion from EQ's can be musical, there are many EQ's which 'color' sound in this way and it sounds great, but sometimes it is not good at all, sub being one of the biggest problem areas.
i think you just gave me a stroke
 

miszt

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#12
EQ's have allot more to do with taste than all the geeky aspects to be honest, some people dont like linear EQ on bass, for eg, just to complicate matters

Well, time to save up and get a Manley Massive Passive I guess.
manley passive is a great EQ, its not linear phase tho, just ''passive'', so has no amplifiers on the signal chain to add electrical noise - linear phase is strictly a digital process
 

smoothassilk

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#14
I like to put a reversed snare before the actual snare- that's a great effect.
I can't really hear the effect of the high latency EQ though- it's so subtle i'm not sure if it's worth doing.
 

spyre

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#15
I like to put a reversed snare before the actual snare- that's a great effect.
I can't really hear the effect of the high latency EQ though- it's so subtle i'm not sure if it's worth doing.
I gave it a try, it does create a kind of fade-in effect but seemed to lower the impact of the snare
 
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