Packing on the pounds

DJPancake

NEW NAME IS DJ INCLINED
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#1
is there any straight forward way to make things sound a bit heavier and more powerful? or does just applied knowledge and experimenting the way to go?

I'm talking both in drums and reese.

using a maximizer (reason 4) and a bit of distortion seems pretty good but maybe not the way the "pros" do it.

-Andy
 

Ketz

Thinkin outside the box..
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#2
well its about getting things right at both mixdown level (all ur individual elements eq'd / if needed compressed correctly) and also at the mastering stage, if u get everything exactly how u want it ur sorted ;)
 

Mr Fletch

aka KRONIX
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#4
I find layering kick drums can help thicken the sound. Put two or three kicks together, taking the punch from one, mid from another and low end from the 3rd. I don't always do this, sometimes I find a single hit is sufficient enough, just depends on the track.
 

subprime

Dysjoint
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#5
I thought this thread was going to be some advice on losing weight........Fucks sake. I've put on 2 stone recently, and now with xmas and all........
 

DJPancake

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#6
2 stone? You English have some odd units of measure! lol! My sister is going to london in a few weeks for a semester to study abroad, i imagine she's going to have quite a good time getting used to the british english. elevator=lift and garbage can=rubish bin, lol.

thanks guys, most of my tracks are good with all the instruments and what-not, they just need that little extra weight to sound pro. And the bad tracks i just delete.
 
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logikz

I Am Not The King
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#7
the exciter plug is made for just that, to add weight to the sound, usually in the low or top regions. overdrive or you know, saturation is a good idea too, but this is extremely general, to make it more specific please post audio of what youd like to beef up
 

Mr Fletch

aka KRONIX
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#8
2 stone? You English have some odd units of measure! lol! My sister is going to london in a few weeks for a semester to study abroad, i imagine she's going to have quite a good time getting used to the british english. elevator=lift and garbage can=rubish bin, lol.

thanks guys, most of my tracks are good with all the instruments and what-not, they just need that little extra weight to sound pro. And the bad tracks i just delete.
lol, yes we do! we spell color, colour too!

We also pronounce garage different to you guys. It's pretty strange really as we all use the english language, yet there are so many differences between how the british and americans speak!
 

DJPancake

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#10
logikz,

Im not necessarily trying to beef up just one instrument, or one drum sample, more the whole track. Lately I've been putting overdrive on the drums ASAP, which makes it allot better. I'll just see what else i can do.

Last night i tried my hand at Dub-Step, and i sounded very close to the D-Step i was listening to. (thejackreview.com podcast)

thanks guys
 

Protoplasym

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#13
My advice is to steer clear of "maximizers" as they are useless in the wrong hands!!

I have an actual hardware 420i Maximizer... I used to run my K. Triton though it back in the day and it'd make my tracks sound brighter and fuller... which to the untrained/inexperienced ear can sound fantastic, but believe me, you don't want to use such an effect 'unless' you specifically know what kind of sound you're going for.

Your best bet as far as 'making things sound thicker/bigger' is to learn how to use filters and EQ. Amplification and Filtering along with the huuuge world of Compression is where you will learn how to accomplish what you seek.


Good luck, it's a lifelong journey.
 
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