noob mixing question(s)!

Discussion in 'DJ's, MC's & Turntablism' started by KIDTAF, Feb 26, 2007.

  1. KIDTAF

    KIDTAF New Member

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    hey guys any of you have any good websites or comments about mixing from one song to another? like techniques, weather you start the 2nd track so when the first track stops or goes into it's 'mellow' tune the 2nd track goes into its 'hard' tune or weather you just wait til one track finishes then mix it into the next track etc..

    also just one question, when you guys try to fade one song to another, does it matter if the second song is a bit faster or would you need to set the pitch to the same as the first track?

    reason why i ask is i was playing around with two tracks of different speeds and just dropping the next track in as the first one finishes, even being at different speeds, it still sounds like a clean change into the other song which is a different speed?

    cheers guys
     
  2. Dustek

    Dustek Finished the PhD

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    This is not meant to be an insult but I see you really have no idea ("start the 2nd track when the 1st stops"). That's a technique that disco djs used before beatmatching appeared (beatmatching is getting the beats in songs aligned so that they play together).

    Generally you don't try & "fade" from one song to another unless the songs are beatmatched which means they'll be pitched the same. If you segue outros into intros without beats, you don't have to pitch the songs to the same exact speed but even if the 'change' feels clean to you, believe me that a dance floor will definitely notice the change in tempo. People can even notice 3% changes in tempo (that's only 4-5bpm). Outro to intro mixing is easy but you won't get any props or keep up any dancefloor pressure doing it. Its not a mistake or bad, just a very limited beginner technique.

    Buy yourself a copy of "How to DJ Right: The Art and Science of Playing Records". Will cost you as much as a record and will be a lot more valuable.

    That said - you don't need to read about this stuff, take a listen instead to your favourite djs mixing (and don't limit yourself to dnb). There are no magic tricks, its listen practise listen practise x 1000.