Need assistance with Recording

Discussion in 'Production' started by StriveDNB, Dec 20, 2013.

  1. StriveDNB

    StriveDNB Member

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    Morning folks,

    Lately I've been recording, but I am not crazy about the end result. ( I do believe the sound could be much better )

    I need some help if anyone has time.

    I just got done recording this a few mins ago and you can tell the audio doesn't sound great.

    I am using audacity to record and I have a USB sound card connected to my PC.

    I am using a Pioneer DJM 400 with 2 Pioneer CDJs 800 MK2

    Any other info you need, please feel free to ask me... The link is only 20mins or less... Thanks alot

    http://www70.zippyshare.com/v/13949095/file.html
     
  2. lostnthesound

    lostnthesound Burns Easily in the Sun

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    What kind of sound card? What type of connection are you using cablewise (ex. XLR, balanced 1/4", etc.) when connecting to said sound card and finally, what is your input recording level typically peaking at?

    Cheers.
     
    Last edited: Dec 20, 2013
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  3. StriveDNB

    StriveDNB Member

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  4. lostnthesound

    lostnthesound Burns Easily in the Sun

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    Gotcha. Well there are few problems going on here...

    When recording audio, especially going from analog to digital, it's all about delivering a strong signal, clean signal that doesn't clip (clipping = greater than 0dB in digital audio).

    It's been a while since I've used audacity, but I believe it does have an input recording meter/monitor that shows you how "hot" or strong/loud your signal is. I would try to peak around -6db so you have a bit of headroom for processing later.

    Please don't take offense when I make the following statement: the sound card you're using isn't good...at all.

    Try to visualize the audio signal path: For starters, you're using a two to 1 (RCA to 1/8") cable. RCA's are unbalanced (not-grounded), so you're signal has already begun to deteriorate. From the RCA's, it travels to the little 1/8" where your audio again has been deteriorated as the true L/R information has been squished into a single source (1/8" male). That signal will now be fed through your audio interface (Sound Blaster) and will become 1's and 0's that make up your recording as well as the audible playback coming from your speakers.

    Part of delivering a quality signal to a recording device is making sure you have a quality means to get the signal from point A (DJ mixer, hardware synth, etc.) to point B (your audio interface/computer). Balanced TRS cables, XLR cables or in your case because you're using a Pioneer 400, RCA to 1/4" cables. While they are not balanced, you will still get a better signal this way then using 2 to 1.

    The other part of audio recording that is essential in terms of obtaining good quality is choosing the right interface. More expensive interfaces typically have more inputs/outputs in addition to hi quality preamps/A-D D-A converters. That said, there's nothing wrong with getting a "cheaper" audio interface so long as it meets your needs. This Presonus box for example is only $150 and gives you the option of using either 1/4" or XLR cables and the box itself has some rather quality preamps/converters.

    Yes, you'll have to spend a bit of money, but the end result/product will be worth it. If price is an issue, I find that bargain hunting on eBay can turn up some excellent deals.

    Cheers.
     
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  5. StriveDNB

    StriveDNB Member

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    No offense taken.. it was just something to use rather than what was being used.

    and thanks for the break down on the information you have provided.

    I do appreciate it.

    I have thought about getting XLR cables, but my mixer doesn't have any on it.

    A friend has told me I could get a RCA to XLR at radio shack to use to connect to my KRK. Would this be something that I should also consider besides upgrading to a much better sound card?

    actually I think I may have read the post incorrectly.

    you would recommend the Hosa Stereo RCA to Two Mono 1/4" TS Cable?

    Sorry
     
    Last edited: Dec 21, 2013
  6. smoothassilk

    smoothassilk Active Member

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    Well, this might cause controversy, but there is a theory that the cables do not matter in the slightest. Go and google 'The myth of the perfect mike cable'.

    You may or may not believe it, but try everything you can first before buying any new gear.

    Poor sound quality could be caused by your mic, environment, peaking, your interface or your sound card.
     
  7. lostnthesound

    lostnthesound Burns Easily in the Sun

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    With all due respect, you may have misinterpreted the article (or maybe I misunderstood your post). The article discusses different brand names of cables and the myth that a more expensive brand means better quality. While I agree with this notion to a certain extent, there is a significant difference when it comes to the type of cable. To say that the signal delivered via RCA is of the same quality as balanced cables (TRS or XLR) is incorrect.
     
    Last edited: Dec 21, 2013
  8. smoothassilk

    smoothassilk Active Member

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    I think I misinterpreted your post.. apologies.

    I think that we can agree an RCA cable would be a good idea, but it doesn't matter too much which one.