Junglist From South Africa

Discussion in 'Introduce Yourself' started by SubStation1520, Oct 10, 2014.

  1. SubStation1520

    SubStation1520 New Member

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    Greetings Junglist Community

    My real name is unimportant... Founder of a new movement called Sub Station 1520. I'm from Johannesburg (SA), residing in a small township called Daveyton in the city of Benoni.
    I, together with fellow D-Town heads, got into D&B/Jungle in 2007. I went to my first D&B gig in 2010, at one of SA's biggest movements right now; and it is basically the leading one- "Joburg's Premier Drum & Bass Movement" called 'Science Frikshun'. Camo & Krooked were the special guest acts.
    In 2011, I started DJ'ing (career was complicatedly cut short but, next year I'll pick up where I left off) and occassionally playing around with production of this genre... And in 2012, I basically became the first Black guy in the country (and continent) to host D&B gigs in the township (ghetto) under the name 'Blast Out Drum & Bass', which later I was forced to change to 'Likwidation Dayz'. And I recorded and uploaded my first mix (which Souncloud got rid off). We also did our first music video for 'Dub Phizix & Skeptical - Marka Feat. Strategy (D-Town Edit)' in 2013, as part of a competition when Dub Phizix was in the country, but we never won 'cause it was purposefully made that way, as part of the pointless conspiracies.
    All I can say is that, my journey as part of this culture has not been easy, and continues being so. I've met, and know a lot of our local talent who raise the flag, and I was mentored by DJ Benson- a prominent icon, renowned countrywide, and is the first Black D&B DJ in SA; as well as Tehsynes- who's also a highly revered figure. They both believed in meI, and keep on motivating me. On the other hand, I've faced criticism, some heavyweights (of different skin colour) in the scene conspiring against what I was trying to build, as well as lack of proper funding and turn-downs from venue owners in my locality; as well as sponsors. However, I've always been strong because of where I come from, and I'll continue with a revolution, under the umbrella of the worldwide D&B/Jungle revolution.

    Nowadays, I write album reviews and interviews for a blog run by a friend called Bass For The Raver (BFTR), since the beginning of the year. To date, some of the most honourable reviews I've done, were for Seba's 'Mesmerise'; Dance Concept's 'Stevie Hyper D - Generation Hyper' and interviewing Benny V; Total Science's 'Warm 031', amongst a few others.
    Sub Station 1520 is the new movement on a clean slate, and I hope to make something good with it, and resume hosting gigs as of next year.

    That is my D&B story summarised.

    I'm glad to be part of the forum. Thanks.
     
    Last edited: Oct 10, 2014
  2. jungle_fever

    jungle_fever Well-Known Member

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    I lived near Polokwane for a few years and had a few mates who lived in Gauteng so its nice to have a south african here. I saw that Dub Phizix night too.

    As far as the racism thing goes, at the birth of jungle, the majority of the prominant DJs and MCs were black so im not quite sure why they are making you feel like the different one. One thing i think the dnb scene has always prided itself on (at least in the uk) is the integration of everyone from all different cultures and subcultures.

    anyways man welcome to the forum
     
    SubStation1520 likes this.
  3. SubStation1520

    SubStation1520 New Member

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    Exactly my point! As well as a vision of seeing all races combined in the ghetto, and jamming to it. It's like taking it back to the roots, only this time it also applies in an ancient context since well "Africa was spawned from the Drum!"... The thing is, I was like a mad man because these things were done in subtle and smart ways, to avoid bombardment concerning the impact that Negroids had in the roots of Jungle. In this country, majority of Black folk regard it as strictly "White music" hence, my efforts to practically kill that stereotype and norm.
    Anyways that's the past, we gonna make things different this time. Politics suck. Let the music speak.

    Thanks Jungle Fever! :)... Where do you reside nowadays?