I'm trying to be as PC as possible when I ask....

1992

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#1
I'm really curious....

Do people of "African decent" even listen to DnB anymore these days?

I'm listening to a current DnB mix right now and the tunes sound as blue eyed as they come. This stuff might as well be gabba. The basslines aren't even half stepped anymore in these.

Theres only really two groups of producers I know of that still maintain the real jungle sound (Digital+Spirit, Loxy+Ink) with the proper dubby basslines. So as a result I wonder if the "urban" comunity even reguards DnB as being a "black" sound?
 

Serum

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#2
It has definitely lost the rhythm that it used to have that's for sure

There are a few people still pushing that but it's not getting a widespread audience
 

Time Dependant

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#3
Alot of tunes are getting very, very repetitive at the moment but there are some producers still banging outthegood old sound, Digital & Spirit, Loxy & Ink,Amit (this guy is fucking awsome), Break, A-Sides. I've noticed that alot of liquid & soulful d&b is becoming more orientated back to the groove rather than a mashup style. Take A.I, & alot of Breakage's work, miles better then alot of 5 minutes & forgotten tunes!!
 

moriaty

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#4
1992 said:
I'm really curious....

Do people of "African decent" even listen to DnB anymore these days?
If you believe the theory that the human race evolved in Africa,
then ye, we afrikcans are lovin it.. :)
 

V Matt

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#5
1992 said:
.

Theres only really two groups of producers I know of that still maintain the real jungle sound (Digital+Spirit, Loxy+Ink) with the proper dubby basslines.
I think there's more people than that

Check out Breakage, Equinox, Senses :slayer:
 

freeagent

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#6
Yes, there are many many producers of many ethnic backgrounds. As for event patrons here in America, I'd have to say there are very few.
 

1992

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Yeah Alex, thats what I thought. Yet back in 1996 being in a jungle room in DC was like being at a rap convention.

Most of the stuff that comes out now I look at as the want-a-be replacement of teen-angst metal. Just listen to the latest Mr. Mason mix and you'll see what I'm talking about. It sounds like "Rage Against the Machine", and they dress like it too! Its far removed from anything resembling dance music.
It certainly doesn't sound urban or black.
 

moriaty

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#8
1992 said:
It certainly doesn't sound urban or black.
But isnt that the beauty of dnb ? that it can transform into anything, even to the extent, like you said, to not resemble dance music. And, correct me if wrong, was there anything remotely black about early hardcore, from which dnb evolved? (glowsticks, whistles, white gloves, even the bloody mc's where white.)
 

D BREAKNECK

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#9
I was gonna say, surely DnB originated as a (at the time) uniquely multicultural music form, the producers, DJs, MCs, ravers (and promoters) were from a very integrated diverse background.

It was always a multicultural urban music form, not a 'black' one, and in London (and I'm sure Bristol too, still very much is).

As for 'like being at a rap convention' I'm not sure if you are really 'trying to be as PC as possible'.

:confused:

:lighter:
 

1992

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#10
Well saying "Im trying to be as pc as possible" before saying something is like saying.

"I'm trying to be as polite as possible when I say that you suck". :lol:


Anyway I've always envisioned proper hardcore and jungle as sounding as ethnic as possible and I think thats the way it should sound. :shrug: When it sounds "white" it seems very wrong to me.

When you listen to the early works of Simon Smith you get the feeling your deep in the jungles of africa. Or when you listen to 92 Acen Razvi productions you can see the influence that the reagional music had on him (hes of middle eastern background).

That doesn't happen too much anymore save for DJ Markey with his productions which I happen to appreciate.
 
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