esx logic

Discussion in 'Production' started by kieran t, Jan 29, 2013.

  1. kieran t

    kieran t Member

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    can you eq your layerd samples if you layer them on one key,like 3 kicks all on c1, or do i have to do it a different way?
    hope that makes sense
     
  2. kieran t

    kieran t Member

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    eq them together as whole or individual
     
  3. lostnthesound

    lostnthesound Burns Easily in the Sun

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    Yes and No.

    What you need to do is:

    1. Setup the EXS24 in Multi-Output mode.
    2. Open the EXS24 key editor and drop your 3 samples into the editor.
    3. I believe you can define the same key for all three sounds so that pressing one triggers all three. However, I would create a key trigger for each layer so you can adjust the "velocity" of each for more control.
    4. Now you can define the channel destination of each sample (Change from "Stereo Out to EXS 1/2, EXS 3/4 etc. for stereo and EXS 11, EXS 12, etc. for mono).
    5. Next, open up your channel mixer and locate the EXS24 channel strip. Notice on the bottom right corner of the strip there is a "+" Click on this and it will create your multi-output channel strips. I would rename each one (for example: Hi Kick, Mid Kick, Low/Sub Kick). Edit each accordingly.
    6. Change the output of these newly created strips so that they all go to the same bus so you can sculpt and unify the newly created layered kick (perhaps some compression for "glue.")

    Cheers.
     
    Last edited: Jan 29, 2013
    bn14 likes this.
  4. Prideinyouride

    Prideinyouride Member

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    Lost, you learn something new every day. Rex files here I come!
     
  5. kieran t

    kieran t Member

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    Ill have a good go at it when I get home but ATM iam lost lol , thanks though mate
     
  6. lostnthesound

    lostnthesound Burns Easily in the Sun

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    Nice! :) You can definitely have more fun using REX files with the EXS24. Lots of fun little tricks...


    All good man! Have a go at it and if you get stuck, send me a PM.

    Cheers.
     
  7. Elzerk

    Elzerk 00111100 00110011

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    REX files are da boss
     
  8. kieran t

    kieran t Member

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    What are Rex files and whats good about using them??
     
  9. lostnthesound

    lostnthesound Burns Easily in the Sun

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    REX is a proprietary file format created by Propellarhead Recycle, though it's compatible with non-Propellarhead DAWs. Essentially, it's an audio file that contains "slices" of the hits/transients within it.

    What makes it special is its flexibility. For example, let's say I have a DnB break that's a REX file. After auditioning the break, I decide I like the kick and snare, but nothing else going on in the break. When I import the REX file into Logic, I can visually see every single hit and they are already separated, so I can cut the pieces I like and delete the others. This way, I don't have to manually chop up the loop nor do I have to worry about other hits "bleeding" into the sounds I want to keep.

    That's just the tip of the iceberg. Samplers (ex. EXS24) can import a REX file and assign each transient/slice to a key. Essentially, it deconstructs the REX file and places each hit on a key–essentially mapping out a drum kit for you!

    The other advantage (especially for drums) is non-destructive time stretching. Rather than "stretch" samples which can affect audio quality, the DAW aligns/snaps the slices and applies light fades to each slice for smooth playback. Often times, when drum loops/samples are stretched, they lose their intensity and punch. By using a REX file, each hit maintains it's impact.

    When it comes to other sounds like synth/bass loops, the results can be spotty, especially when the BPM is dramatically different (ex. 125 to 175). Usually some fine tuning of the defined crossfades can fix this, but there are sometimes where it may just not "sound" right.

    Regardless, REX is quite lovely when it comes to dealing with all things percussion related, IMO.

    Cheers.
     
  10. kieran t

    kieran t Member

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    Ahhhh i wondered how to do that still not 100% but i got an idea now n yeah that is sick!
    This weekends gonna be fun :) thanks again ye
     
  11. T:M

    T:M Dusty Techno Workout

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    This I didn't know! Thanks! Staying on topic, do you know if it's possible to load stuff into the sampler without being required to save it? It's becoming a real pain having to save it as an instrument when I know it's probably going to be a 1-off usage of the sound (like playing with a vocal sample for a remix).
     
  12. lostnthesound

    lostnthesound Burns Easily in the Sun

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    Great question. To be honest, I haven't quite figured out the Zen with regards to the EXS saving functions. It seems no matter what options I choose, it never does exactly what I was looking for.

    For example, I wanted to do the same thing you're looking for–save my EXS instrument/sample mapping without importing the samples locally. In the "Save As" dialog box if I choose "Save EXS Instrument to Folder" but not "Save EXS Audio Samples to Folder," every time I save my project (or EXS Instrument) I end up getting the "!" next to my samples in the EXS24 editing window, indicating these samples are now missing. Even more strange is the fact that the samples will still play...until you close out the window. It's a terrible bug (or perhaps user error?) that is annoying to say the least. Especially if I do something like simply change the channel routing, it still causes this error.

    So to answer your question, I haven't found a way to effectively create a "one off" kit...though there is a small workaround...

    What I find works best is to turn on "Copy EXS Instruments/Samples to Folder" in the "Save As" dialogue box. This way it will create a local version (in your project folder) of your stuff without saving to the main EXS Samples folder on your main HDD directory. But here's the key: As you're dropping samples into your EXS24 sample/key editor window, I would strongly recommend renaming the audio files once you've placed them in the sampler (I believe you can double click to do this) prior to saving. Keeping the default name of the audio file will result in Logic finding duplicates every time you open up your project. While it may seem like no big deal, you'll find that it quickly becomes a HUGE pain in the dick. By renaming them, they are independent from the other files and will only be referenced within your project.

    Hope this helps a bit.

    Cheers.
     
  13. T:M

    T:M Dusty Techno Workout

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    Thanks! This will indeed help! Certainly do hope they are working on fixing this for Logic X!