drum patterns

Dj_Fozzybear

Greenpiece Records
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#3
El Prophet said:
when making a drum pattern is it right to use different snares as sort hi hats behind the main snares:monkey:
Yeah man thats the deal!!
They are called "shuffle" snares or "ghost" snares. thats how you get depth and the kinda "in-and-out" feel to the beat. In fact you can use pretty much anything in the background (even kicks man as a lot of tech stuff does Noisia etc)
Just google ghost snares/ drum and bass/shuffle. loadsa advice from all types of people (and not just D+B producers there are some useful tips from some rock guys as well)
:2thumbs:
:i_love_co
 

Indi

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#4
I like to use an open hat behind the main snare, delay it a tiny bit and mess with the envelope, then turn the volume of it down a bit, maybe even cut it at the the next kick. This gives the snare a hissy release from the initial whack, which sounds goodem (y)


Also if you are using hihats on every two beats, try reversing the 2nd, 4th, etc for a shuffle effect


Another good tip is to use two channels of identical hihats and layer them at different volumes to get a rhythmic effect.
So the first channel would be like this:

h - h - h - h - h - h - h - h -

and the second channel would be at a slightly higher volume with the pattern looking like this:

- - h - - - h - h - - - - - h -


I use all of these to emphasise my snares, whether it be ghost or main snares. You can get the same effect without the shuffle snares you know, and they sound cleaner and a bit more rolling IMO.


(y)
 
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Dj_Fozzybear

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#5
Indi said:
Another good tip is to use two channels of identical hihats and layer them at different volumes to get a rhythmic effect.
So the first channel would be like this:

h - h - h - h - h - h - h - h -

and the second channel would be at a slightly higher volume with the pattern looking like this:

- - h - - - h - h - - - - - h -


I use all of these to emphasise my snares, whether it be ghost or main snares. You can get the same effect without the shuffle snares you know, and they sound cleaner and a bit more rolling IMO.
(y)
:word:
 
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#6
Indi said:
I like to use an open hat behind the main snare, delay it a tiny bit and mess with the envelope, then turn the volume of it down a bit, maybe even cut it at the the next kick. This gives the snare a hissy release from the initial whack, which sounds goodem (y)


Also if you are using hihats on every two beats, try reversing the 2nd, 4th, etc for a shuffle effect


Another good tip is to use two channels of identical hihats and layer them at different volumes to get a rhythmic effect.
So the first channel would be like this:

h - h - h - h - h - h - h - h -

and the second channel would be at a slightly higher volume with the pattern looking like this:

- - h - - - h - h - - - - - h -


I use all of these to emphasise my snares, whether it be ghost or main snares. You can get the same effect without the shuffle snares you know, and they sound cleaner and a bit more rolling IMO.


(y)
thanx alot im already starting to get some busy rolling beats going(y), did u mean even keep the the pattern identical or or different or i suppose whatever sounds best with the tune
 

Indi

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#7
El Prophet said:
thanx alot im already starting to get some busy rolling beats going(y), did u mean even keep the the pattern identical or or different or i suppose whatever sounds best with the tune
Do whatever sounds good with the beat any pattern you think is fine. I was just giving an example of how to use several layers of identical hats to give volume fluctuations to accentuate the roll of the beat.
Add shuffles, open hats, rimshots, etc to give your beat lots of roll and soul (y)
 
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