Where should my kick sit in the mix?

Discussion in 'Production' started by Karl_F, Oct 31, 2009.

  1. Karl_F

    Karl_F New Member

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    Ive only recently started making D+B, I used to make other forms of dance music, usually where the bass would play on the off beat. I spent ages trying to get the kick as fat as the bass. Now im doing D+B the kick and bass play at the same time, should I low cut the kick so the only the sub hits the lower frequencies? Or are there techniques to better over come this problem?

    Any tips/advice would be greatly appreciated! :)
     
  2. You should always EQ out any unwanted low end on your Kick drums so as they don't conflict with your sub. Roll off around 60hz to start to leave space for your sub. Your sub should sit below 60hz really - Kick around 80-100hz. Test your kick with your sub first as sometimes they can sound flabby together. If you're sounds are EQ'd right the kick should cut through nicely - if not - find a different kick that workd with your sub.
     
  3. Dj Methodist

    Dj Methodist soundcloud.com/methodist

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    what he said said said
     
  4. dj_bmc

    dj_bmc Member

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    yeah, wot that first dude said, it would be different for music types that rely less on bass but for dnb, the lowest sound you'll hear is the sub, so therefore u din't want ur kick to interfere with it.
     
  5. RevTech

    RevTech Butthole=output transduce

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    I've read "the Remixer's Bible" which is a great read, I recomend it, and in it says that a possible way to make iot come thru is to pan your kickdrum and your bassline very slightly off each other to make it come thru.

    Now frequency wise, it would take me a while to write down things so I suggest what I say to a lot of things...

    SEARCH THE FORUM. 99 percent of questions on here have been asked before!
     
  6. moriaty

    moriaty Active Member

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    between a low hum and a high whine
    hmm, not too sure about that. perhaps thats something that could be done when mixing a band song, but i wouldnt recommend it for rave music. your kick and low bass should have little width and be dead centre.

    in regard to the original question. it really depends on what sort of feel you're trying to achieve. as mentioned, one method is to high pass your kick, and let the sub completely take over the lows. for this style, most producers use kicks with a fundamental around 100 hz.
    another method is to sidechain your kick to the bass, as to duck it every time the kick comes through. in that case you want your kick to go much lower, around 60 hz or so, or even better, tune your kick to be on the same note as your bass.
    also, sidechaining doesnt have ot be achieved just by compressors. you can also rend everything to audio, and use fades. cubase has an amazing fade editor, and it can mimic a great "pump" feel much faster and accurate than any compressor i have used. and dont forget that sidechaining isnt the only option. a lot of steppy tunes simply dont have any bass when the kick plays. arranging is very important in that case, and audio is again more accurate, as you can see when your bass finishes and kick starts.
    these are just guidelines, and its often that you'll manage to discover a wonderful combination of kick/bass that will happily exist together without any eq or compression, whereas other times you could be fighting for days to sort out your low end clashes to no avail. so yeah, numbers are good, techniques can be useful, but what matters at the end is how it sounds.
    (y)
     
    Last edited: Nov 1, 2009
  7. Protoplasym

    Protoplasym Nuskool

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    It depends on what your Sub is doing.

    Also... depending on how your KD is shaped and how much decay it has... you might be able to have a KD reside alongside your Sub. This is especially possible if you have a Sub with an attack that's not very sharp/fast.

    If you have a Sub that takes a half second or more to come in full volume on each note on, then you can have a KD in the same frequency range hitting sharply (with a fast attack) in that space.

    Bottom line is that you're trying to make low end frequencies (100 khz and below) from different sounds compliment each other. Think of them as colors on a canvas.... if you use too many colors on top of each other... you end up with a black mess.

    Well, likewise: if you crowd the low end space, you end up with muddyness.


    Also, it's not 'always' a perfect science as far as looking at when your KD and Sub hit frequency wise in a Spectrum Analyzer: sometimes, frequencies 100khz-1K can influence how sounds "gel" in the lower end... in the end, after watching your low end work in a SA, make sure you rely on your ears to guide you.



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