Where do producers..

Rubs90

KeyControl
VIP Junglist
Messages
2,023
Likes
5
#1
... usually get their background sounds from? In a common dnb intro, besides the drums you usually have a song / sample being looped, like a violin, a piano or even both combined making a sort of "song"

I've been working hard on this recently but cant get my head around it
 

safety

double safety
VIP Junglist
Messages
6,366
Likes
29
#5
clue is in the name "sample"

they take samples from anywhere, film, other music, anything you can find on the internet. that crystal clear trumpet is almost certainly taken from a film soundtrack. they are very good sources for music without other elements underneath, like drums and that
 
B

BDS

Guest
#10
clue is in the name "sample"

they take samples from anywhere, film, other music, anything you can find on the internet. that crystal clear trumpet is almost certainly taken from a film soundtrack. they are very good sources for music without other elements underneath, like drums and that

not neccesarily that brass line sounds very much like it was made in sax lab.

thats a vst btw.
 

groelle

Well-Known Member
VIP Junglist
Messages
5,485
Likes
90
#11
are we talking about leads/hooks here? load up your sampler or synth and write your own - that's what i do...
this. nothing wrong with sampling, but searching for something that fits seems to be too time intensive imo. if you found something and get an idea from that, its different.
 

kama

benkama.net
VIP Junglist
Messages
2,767
Likes
48
#12
If you cant find any suiting your needs, try to make your own too.

Lowpassing a lush pad produces interesting results, kind of anticipating something.

Reversing piano hits with revertb is always an eerie way of saying "tings is mad in here"

Timestretching something to oblivion can produce incredible ambient backgrounds.

Using single hits but having them run into a massive reverb and removing the dry part is like making love to a sound. Then reversing the hit (if it is a longer one) you'll get a sweep sound like no other.

Try also short delays with huge feedbacks. Be careful and watch your ears tho, dont let the resonance get the best of it. This is an excellent way of filling a background if you find a sample that goes well in key with the rest of the tune.
 

dj-dusty

Member
VIP Junglist
Messages
904
Likes
1
#15
find an old tape or cd with loads of classical intruments or even get a few film soundtracks and look through em.

What i do is every time i watch a film, i remember or jot down the time of the film where there is either a peice of music or a vocal i will want to use, then buy the film or borrow it and chop it out and sample it.

Works better if you put other instruments with it though, try and get it to sound like somthing brand new instead of you just ripping it straight from a film
 

Riisu

Not the Preacher Man
VIP Junglist
Messages
7,304
Likes
226
#16
you can get audio libraries on vinyl (which you obviously have to sample to your computer) but it'll get you that instant 'analog warmth'


propers to sabre on that tip.
 

Rubs90

KeyControl
VIP Junglist
Messages
2,023
Likes
5
#17
Since I'm a great fan of film scores, I found this to be easier then I expected and found some good loops I'd like to sample.. problem is when I try to chop it off and put them into FL studio I never get the result I want.. either the beginning is too forced and when the loop goes back to the beginning there's this huge clang or it's either too fast or too slow

Any help on this?
 
Top