What's the right system?

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#1
Easy folkz,
I'm a 17 y.o. dnb producer and I'm making dnb for about one year know
I've learned a lot in this time and if I'm comparing my older tunes with my newest one's I reckon a huge difference
The most people who had a listen to my tunes said that the thing I have to 'learn' in the next years is to bring out my own style and get a bit better quality on my tunes
But in the last few days I thought a lot about how I should actually go for there
Do you think I should spend the whole time on a tune till the tunes finished? Or do you think I'd rather make several projects and went for it like: 'um..i'm gonna make new tracks mondays, and mixdown at the weekend, ...'

I know the question seems to be a bit paradox as I think the most of you produce like 'i don't care about these thoughts, i just get my tunes done and don't care about how I went there' but maybe there are a few people who think the same like me...

You have to excuse my bad english, I'm from germany :D
Cheers
 

lostnthesound

Burns Easily in the Sun
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#4
To be honest, you're overthinking everything a bit, and that in itself is a recipe for disaster.

For myself and msmith222, we work on a tune until we hit a wall or feel as though we need a break from that track. After hearing the same song (with the same sounds, sequences, etc) over and over, the ears tend to get fatigued and you will begin making decisions about sounds, the mix, etc. without truly "hearing" what's going on–making for a shit track. When I find I'm about to hit a wall, I either walk away from the DAW or start another track. After a couple days I'll go back to the tune I walked away from and see if the creative juices are flowing again.

Another good tip is to listen to your mix on different sound systems to get a feel for what's missing, especially when you A/B it against a pro tune.

Have fun. The minute it starts to feel like "work" is a sign it's time to take a break.

Cheers.
 
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#9
I think the most important thing you can do, if you're looking to get in the right mindset, is to be proactive with both producing and learning to produce, and start meeting plenty of people. be a part of dnb, a part of the music production scene, read magazines, keep up to date with channels and labels, and it's inevitable that you'll progress..
 

Sulihin

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#10
This is ten percent luck, twenty percent skill
Fifteen percent concentrated power of will
Five percent pleasure, fifty per... pleh
there is no system mate, just do your thing
Sorry for the off-topic but I think our next forum competition (after the apocalypse if we still do that one) should require this be used as lyrics.
 

sam the dnb man

Variation
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#13
I used to overthink everything. I developed complicated techniques which really baffled a lot of people but in all honesty the simple techniques actually sounded a lot better.
When you focus on trivial shit you forget what is important. Having fun and making music.
Work at your own pace and don't try to rush things. You're only 17. You aren't even old enough to network properly apart from online obviously. Producers are getting younger and younger these days. But it feels like they are trying to rush things.

I think the only time you should worry about a schedule is when you have a release forthcoming or you're paying to use a studio.
 
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