Whats in a good sound?

Muonos

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#1
Hey DnB World,

I've been producing for a little bit now (5 months). Of course this can always pertain to what genre and track you make, but is there anything that denotes a good sound? Obviously you can hear a sound in your track and know if it flows or not, but are there any basics to getting clean sounds no matter what it is (bassline, lead, fx). Instead of slowly fiddling with effects filters and EQ is what are the best ways to inspect your sound and "fix" it? Thanks
 

Elzerk

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#2
Good sound doesn't collaps hard to already existing ones in the mix of a track. I can't quite understand what answer you're looking for but every sound should be compressed and volumed right to flow with eachother, you can add pretty much any sound to your tune if it's correctly mixed with others. The final mixdown and the mastering determines how the sounds come together and that can be altered, so you shouldn't worry too much about fx. Fixing a sound happens (at least in my ones) at the final projects mixer. Just gotta eq unnecessary bits away, or parts that won't fit. Reverb and eq'ing is a great way of making different basslines fit togehter.

There's not any way determine what sound is a good sound, if it's good quality. Every sound can be altered to fit, and I usually layer everything. All sounds have good sides and they should be layered to make something working together imo.

If you want quick fix to a shitty sound, I'd suggest use compressing.

And a great way of inspecting your sound is spectrogram! Maybe the best way yet of analysing a sound.
 
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Forau

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#3
Good sound doesn't collaps hard to already existing ones in the mix of a track. I can't quite understand what answer you're looking for but every sound should be compressed and volumed right to flow with eachother, you can add pretty much any sound to your tune if it's correctly mixed with others. The final mixdown and the mastering determines how the sounds come together and that can be altered, so you shouldn't worry too much about fx. Fixing a sound happens (at least in my ones) at the final projects mixer. Just gotta eq unnecessary bits away, or parts that won't fit. Reverb and eq'ing is a great way of making different basslines fit togehter.

There's not any way determine what sound is a good sound, if it's good quality. Every sound can be altered to fit, and I usually layer everything. All sounds have good sides and they should be layered to make something working together imo.

If you want quick fix to a shitty sound, I'd suggest use compressing.

And a great way of inspecting your sound is spectrogram! Maybe the best way yet of analysing a sound.

Id pos rep you, but your sigs pissing me off.
 

marcelkennard

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#5
I don't know if this helps, but I try to focus on the original sound before any effects. Get the original sound as close as possible to what you want, then it will be easy to make it sound better through subtle alterations with effects
 

lostnthesound

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#7
Tough question with the potential for wide spectrum of answers. IMO, a good sound:
  • has a high resolution (not always necessary, but a definite plus)
  • has been EQ'd to remove unwanted frequencies
  • has been EQ'd to add character
  • doesn't conflict with any other sounds in the track (especially percussion)
  • has been process for enhancement
  • doesn't conflict with any other sounds in the track
  • helps the song as opposed to hurting it

Cheers.
 

tv_g

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#8
Just gotta eq unnecessary bits away, or parts that won't fit.
This part I agree with.

Every sound can be altered to fit
... and this.

If you want quick fix to a shitty sound, I'd suggest use compressing.
but i don't follow how this fixes anything unless you use it as a distortion which causes nightmares fixing other people's mixes.
with solid eqing skills, you'll be able to adjust a sound in seconds with a couple bands.

And a great way of inspecting your sound is
listening. :teeth:
 

Elzerk

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#9
I don't think he has in his 5 months already learned to tell all shitty parts in a sound by ear, and it's true dat you shouldn't compress if someone else is fixing the mix. Ideal would be achieving perfect mix without compression, but I think not even all pro's can do that.
 

tv_g

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#10
I don't think he has in his 5 months already learned to tell all shitty parts in a sound by ear, and it's true dat you shouldn't compress if someone else is fixing the mix. Ideal would be achieving perfect mix without compression, but I think not even all pro's can do that.
of course there is a time for compression but it is 1 in 1000 compared to using eq. compression changes the dynamics so i don't see how that is going to fix a low quality sound.
and i was taught not to use spectrum analysis because you won't train your ears. just saying...
 
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#11
why not use a tool like a spectrum analyser, ears are your main tool granted, but its nice to have another aid, especially if your using monitors/headphones with a limited frequency response and given that alot of heads dont have/cant afford 8"+ monitors, its crucial to "see" what frequencies your sounds are hitting...
 
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#12
A little thing to remember when youve finished a track is to make sure all instruments or samples have their own space in the spectrum so that nothing is fighting to get out. for example, if you have a low sub bass and a drum loop, you may want to low pass the sub and cut off at the frequency the drums become most prominent, or vice verse, cut of the drums at around 180hz. Obviously apply this to everything to wear you think they should b in the mix n it will make everything fit alot better.
 

Muonos

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#13
Thanks for all the responses guys. I have been trying to practice using the spectrum analyzer to balance frequencies. I always do run into a problem however. Lets say I have an awesome sample for a percussion fx. But the sample conflicts with other frequencies like my lead and bass and it gets damped by either or. Do you usually find a new sound or just work with the original and to get it to flow better. Usually I try my luck at melting into my track but I usually end up just picking a new sound and I feel like most people don't take this route
 

tv_g

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#15
why not use a tool like a spectrum analyser, ears are your main tool granted, but its nice to have another aid, especially if your using monitors/headphones with a limited frequency response and given that alot of heads dont have/cant afford 8"+ monitors, its crucial to "see" what frequencies your sounds are hitting...
well hence the ":teeth:" in my original post but there are enough threads here and on every music forum that are evidence beginners get caught up looking at spectrums before learning or in place of learning to listen.
 
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#16
well hence the ":teeth:" in my original post but there are enough threads here and on every music forum that are evidence beginners get caught up looking at spectrums before learning or in place of learning to listen.
haha no beef man, just sayin'... I agree, you definately cant see a resonant frequency when eq'uing. but for bass work, a spectrum analyser is essential with a limited set up
 
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