What actually is Jump up???

jungle_fever

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#1
So yea basically Jump up has changed so much over the last 15 years so i just thought i would start a thread trying to establish where it is at at the moment.

The last jump up records i bought were things like Crystal clear - Streethawk, Taxman - Demolition man, Original sin - Seen.

Now i look at what people are calling jump up and it sounds more like the deeper side of drum and bass i like now.

What actually is jump up these days?


Heres a timeline of what people have been calling jump up over the last 15 years or so

1995

1998

2001

2005

2008

2010

2013
 
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jungle_fever

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#6
Posted this in the other thread but i think it needs to be in here

at all? maybe you need your ears checking man seeing as 3 or so people in here have labeled it jump up. Got the energy, got the bass, its just a league above anything else thats come out jump up-wise this year thats all which is pretty standard with hazard releases! Dont get me wrong though I see what your saying. It has elements to make it not seem like a jump up tune. but you get a load of 100% strictly jump up heads in a room and bang on time tripping and tell me they dont 'jump up' :p


The only reason people call time tripping Jump up is cos its by hazard. If it was made by Octane & DLR then it would be just considered neuro/tech

for example Enei - Centrifuge or Gerra + Stone - Droneheads (Octane & DLR remix) i would consider to be more jump up than time tripping but they will be considered tech/neuro as they are made by established tech/neuro producers
 

Agent Smith

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#8
yea thats the jump up i remember. Playaz in room 1 in fabric for original sins album launch. What has happened to that style now?
Fucking hell I was there for that. Long time ago.

I personally see Time Tripping as a diverse tune, I certainly wouldn't label it jump-up just because its Hazard.

I agree with you about Centrifuge Jungle Fever - definitely a more "dancefloor" orientated tune, which could well be perceived as jump-up, regardless whether Enei produced it or not.

That Break tune Rare Earth is typically a dancefloor orientated tune, one of my mates who has only just started raving recently reckoned he heard it a stack load of times at Playaz. Break isn't a jump-up producer, but as with any producer, people can mix up their styles and change it up, as is the case with Rare Earth.

This is why Time Tripping has to be tune of the year, its diverse, it's instantly recognisable, good in the mix (with virtually anything) and its not a "typical" Hazard tune. Its quite unique in a good way, and its staggering people who listen to all different types of dnb know about this tune.
 

iamjoey

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#9
I'm not sure if I actually know how to define jump up as a sub genre.. heavy hitting drums, loud basslines, repetitive and simplistic drum patterns, ????
 

Vanden

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#11
Good thread - I was thinking this the other day. I started out listening to the old 2005-2008 jump up, but now, people like Konichi seem to be making more techy stuff - or at least the few tracks ive heard.
 

rhythm

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#12
regarding the original post: Lemon D's "This is L.A." is not and has never been considered jump-up. If anything at the time it would have been considered "hardstep". Of all the tunes in 95 that you could have picked for being a jump up tune I have no idea why you picked this one.
 

Dubsta

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#13
jump up = backing tracks for mcs

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regarding the original post: Lemon D's "This is L.A." is not and has never been considered jump-up. If anything at the time it would have been considered "hardstep". Of all the tunes in 95 that you could have picked for being a jump up tune I have no idea why you picked this one.
could not agree more.... there was no such thing as jump up before 2000-ish
 

jungle_fever

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#14
regarding the original post: Lemon D's "This is L.A." is not and has never been considered jump-up. If anything at the time it would have been considered "hardstep". Of all the tunes in 95 that you could have picked for being a jump up tune I have no idea why you picked this one.
i have heard this is la being described as jump up before and when i went on to show what recent jump up was, he didnt get it. He put hardstep and jump up in the same category
 

rhythm

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#15
could not agree more.... there was no such thing as jump up before 2000-ish
glad you agree on This is LA, but there absolutely was jump up before 2000. Most (but not all) mid-90's stuff on Dope Dragon, True Playaz, stuff by Aphrodite, were generally considered jump up at the time. The tunes usually had bouncier basslines. My all-time fave jump up tune would be Krust's "Warhead" in 98.
 

rhythm

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#17
i have heard this is la being described as jump up before and when i went on to show what recent jump up was, he didnt get it. He put hardstep and jump up in the same category
who put hardstep and jump up in the same category? There was definitely overlap, but jump up was usually less 'serious' sounding and had more bouncy mid-range basslines than the typically more booming subs that were more common to "hardstep."
 

Fluff

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#18
glad you agree on This is LA, but there absolutely was jump up before 2000. Most (but not all) mid-90's stuff on Dope Dragon, True Playaz, stuff by Aphrodite, were generally considered jump up at the time. The tunes usually had bouncier basslines. My all-time fave jump up tune would be Krust's "Warhead" in 98.
Yep Jump Up was defnitely the term used to describe the straight dancefloor orientated high impact tunes from Urban Takeover, Playaz etc. Not sure I'd have categorised 'Warhead' as Jump Up, more of a roller IMO.
 

jungle_fever

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#19
from wikipedia so take with a pinch of salt

Confusion is increased by the term jump-up which initially referred to tracks which had a change in style at the drop, encouraging people to dance. Initially these would usually be breakbeat-heavy drops in this new drum and bass style, but producers of around the same time were creating tracks with hip-hop style basslines at the drop. This would become a new sub-genre "jump-up", though many of the early jump-up tracks included edited amens at the drop. Influential artists include DJ Zinc, DJ Hype, Dillinja and Aphrodite (artist) amongst many others. The Dream Team would also produce jump-up tracks, usually under the name Dynamic Duo on Joker Records, in a style with similarities and differences to their Suburban Bass releases. Notice also the early use of the term "jump up jungle" rather than "jump up drum and bass". The pigeon-holes for genres changed so quickly that jump-up was quickly also called drum and bass even as a sub-genre.
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so basically there was both jump up jungle, with edited amens and jump up drum and bass
 

rhythm

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#20
Yep Jump Up was defnitely the term used to describe the straight dancefloor orientated high impact tunes from Urban Takeover, Playaz etc. Not sure I'd have categorised 'Warhead' as Jump Up, more of a roller IMO.
I would categorize Warhead as a stepper (pretty much the opposite of a roller :)), but yeah the b-line on that tune is what makes it jump up to me. Tune definitely was universally embraced by everyone from jump up dj's to ed rush & optical, and it wasn't played in strictly jump up circles, but still jump up to me.
 
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