Drum & Bass Want to try sampling and old vinyl or recording. Any tips?

Discussion in 'Production' started by JoelMarlow, Sep 30, 2013.

  1. JoelMarlow

    JoelMarlow New Member

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    Hey guys,

    I want to use and old sample in one of my tracks (haven't found one yet) but i've never really done it before. It will be playing over my piano which is in the key of F major so I take it the sample will need to be in F major. Has anyone else got any other tips? Im also not sure how to go about it. My tracks in the 170 bpm range so should I look for something close to half time so I don't have to change the samples speed to much?

    Cheers :D


    an old vinyl* Sorry
     
    Last edited: Sep 30, 2013
  2. DRWoof

    DRWoof New Member

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    You should be able to use some kind of tuning plugin to get the samples key or try even playing with the sample to find the key and tune to what you need. as for tempo I believe your on the right track with half time sample I could be mistaken though.
     
  3. lostnthesound

    lostnthesound Burns Easily in the Sun

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    • Record the sample at a high quality rate (24/32-bit @ 88.2)
    • Allow yourself some headroom when recording
    • Experiment with different tempo settings on your turntable and record the results (ex. record the sample at original tempo, then +/- 8% etc.)
    • Toss the sample into your DAW of choice and use a BPM counter if you're unsure of the tempo.
    • Stretch the sample as needed using a high-quality time-stretching algorithm.

    Cheers.
     
  4. tv_g

    tv_g Active Member

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    I don't worry about tempo or key when sampling. If I like it, I can tune it (as mentioned) and if the tempo is wrong, I chop it just like breaks. The tricky thing with chopping compared to breaks is that since drums are very noisey they are quite forgiving if you cut at a non-zero crossing. Wide pianos and horns are a pain since phase will mean there are almost no true zero crossing shared between channels. Still I prefer to do it by hand as opposed to stretching, which at least with the plugins I have used, always adds artifacts.



    • Recording in at higher than 44.1 khz is nice because you have room to pitch shift down, but you need to check that your dac/recording device supports it. My input maxes out at 48 khz.