Vinyl Mixing Help

Discussion in 'DJ's, MC's & Turntablism' started by kidchop92, Feb 22, 2015.

  1. kidchop92

    kidchop92 New Member

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    Hi everybody

    New to DNBForum so please go easy on me. This maybe a silly question but it's something that I need clearing up.

    I have been mixing Vinyl for just over 1 year on Stanton t92 which have served me well. However with the push from Record Labels to press on 33RPM I have started to notice that the BPM is not correct. Usually if I mix a 33rpm track with the same BPM on a 45rpm, I notice that the 33rpm will always go slightly faster and go out of sync within 5 seconds.

    For example last night I mixed LSB - Leave 33RPM 174BPM against Spectrasoul - Away with me (Calibre Remix) 45RPM 174BPM. The LSB tune always plays very slightly faster than the Spectrasoul tune and have noticed it always happens with any 33RPM pressed tune against a 45RPM with the same BPM.

    Mixing any tune with the same BPM I expect it to stay in sync.

    Can anybody confirm if this should happen or if it is a problem with my Turntables?
     
  2. Dannyboy93

    Dannyboy93 EL CAPITAIN

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    This happens a bit on my stanton T.62's, all I do is just move the pitch slightly until both tunes are locked in, it's a bit annoying at times but easily fixable by just moving the pitch a bit
     
  3. kidchop92

    kidchop92 New Member

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    Indeed it is annoying. I usually have to decrease the speed of the 33RPM just above were the light goes off 0, how about you?

    For example when i Play LSB - Leave (with the pitch fader set to 0) its playing at like 174.10 BPM causing it to drift off

    Well at least now im not alone, maybe this is a fault with Stanton decks or does this happen on other turntables?
     
    Last edited: Feb 22, 2015
  4. Dannyboy93

    Dannyboy93 EL CAPITAIN

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    I usually move the 45 tune up a bit and the 33 tune down a bit, the light is still on both ways so it is just a slight adjustment,
     
  5. kidchop92

    kidchop92 New Member

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    Ahh does that work?

    I thought even with a slight movement on pitch fader with the light still on, it was still at 0?

    I will try this later, thanks for your help!
     
  6. Gloxxy

    Gloxxy I SNORT COAL

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    The turntable will have an analogue pitch fader which will deteriorate over time. This will cause the pitch to not be as accurate as it was when the turntable was brand new.

    My advice: Disregard what the BPM of the tune is and just use your ears to beatmatch and pitch adjust your cue'd tune.
     
  7. Agent Smith

    Agent Smith Currently Putins Koala

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    This.
    [MENTION=101100]kidchop92[/MENTION] - do you try and mix everything on 0 or near the light just out of interest?
     
  8. Teddy

    Teddy 60% Staff Member

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    you can check if your pitch is correct using the strobe light and the bumps on the plate. they aren't just there for decoration. if that makes sense? if not, here is conway twitty to explain https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KbdK94vl_Bs
     
  9. lug00ber

    lug00ber Active Member

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    Considering the huge amount of minor inaccuracies that can be introduced in the process of making a track until it's pressed you can't really be guaranteed that "174 bpm" is "174 bpm" on anything than the same pressing played on the same turntable.
    Minor inaccuracies can be everywhere from the computer/DAW being used, the lathe used to cut a master or differences between two turntables.

    As has been stated already, you have to rely on your ears to match the beat, and continue to listen for drift/match tempo for as long as you have two tunes in the mix.