using pre-made drum loops

Discussion in 'Production' started by rysk, Feb 19, 2012.

  1. rysk

    rysk Part-time waster

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    is this cheating? I've tried making my own beats from scratch, but no matter what i do it still sounds absolutely gash, so thought i might try using a few royalty free drum loops for now, but it feels like cheating to me.
     
  2. fractal

    fractal Well-Known Member

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    it is kinda cheating imo. i mean its alright to use a little shaker loop or whatever but not as your main drums.

    why are your beats sounding bad? selecting the right samples, and pitching them up and down is the first and a very important part to get them to sound as part of a single kit and not just random one-shots.
    Also, unless you're going for a stripped back minimal beat, dnb beats have a ridiculous amounts of layers; hi-hats, hi-passed breaks, percussion etc. some of which you couldnt pick out unless solo'd.

    Depends on why they arent sounding good though, if its arrangement, id try and listen to a few grooves you like and try and replicate it. After a while you get the hang of knowing what will work and shit and it starts to come naturally. Its all about details though...so many tracks have that standard kick--snare-kick-snare beat, but it still works cause they all have a different groove and shuffle and timbre
     
  3. subprime

    subprime Dysjoint

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    Whether you cheat or not is irrelevant, it's whether you get caught innit?!

    Nah seriously, you learn a lot by learning how to 'drums' but I personally feel more strongly against using synth samples, I'd rather do that myself from scratch, drums, not so bothered. Layering/chopping drum loops can still be considered creative.

    It's kinda treading the borderline between cheating and lazy.
     
    Last edited: Feb 19, 2012
  4. d-low

    d-low I know you got soul

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    this.
    if your making dnb
    i would have to say a large % uses drum breaks for there shuffles/ layer breaks with there own punchy drums on top... calibre or SPY etc rely heavily on em. always been this way since the amen

    but getting your kick and snare right for the break is a whole diff game.. cue the equalizers and compressors ..
     
  5. parsons19

    parsons19 Active Member

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    My opinion on making tunes is use what ya got!

    If you got a nice chord progression loop from a pack or a cool drum beat and you are really feeling it in your tune then why not use it! Of course, even a subtle change to it can make it more your own and when it comes to drums you can do all sorts of stuff to make it a bit more unique. Chopping, EQing, effects, etc.

    Just use the resources you have to make your tracks :)

    However, I will add, if you personally feel like it is cheating and you aren't comfortable with it then I say learn how to make your own beats. I much prefer making beats from one shots :D (I do occasionally use a high hat loop or something though!)
     
  6. yogi23

    yogi23 Member

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    You will most probably have to layer the drum loop aswell to get it sounding good. Drum loops such as funk breaks.can give your drums that live feel aswell. Have you watched any master class videos ? There's some good ones on drum processing
     
  7. T:M

    T:M Dusty Techno Workout

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    Well for the most part you're just starting out right? IMO if you're just starting using premade loops is fine as you can get more of the feel for how a track should be structured if you aren't familiar with how to write.

    Also, just my view you might be able to get a better idea about making your own drum loops if you started out with something like a simple house loop, something with less elements/layers and you can focus on getting fewer sounds to mesh. I feel it's easier to start with house in both producing and djing, just my two cents.

    Even once you get used to making your own I think it's still a good idea to keep a folder of premade ones so that you can quickly get an idea of what a synth would sound like with a beat under it (if your just noodling around and making patches for later that is).