Typical technical/theoretical question

Messages
3
Likes
0
#1
Hi, since some time I've been producing some DnB and not only stuff (I was producing hip hop beats before for 2 years) and I've got a question which is bothering me though.

When you're using different samples from various tracks and try to create e.g. bass or other synthesized tracks to match with it, are you always watch out for appriopriate notes to sound with it? I mean simply- if you have for example sample which starts with C note and continues with some other notes and I wanna create bassline or sth else which will be played simultaneously with that sample should I always create bassline which 'follows' it by notes?

I always try to keep very tight to notes disonance but it makes my production quite hard because of pretty difficult recognition of notes which samples got especially when more than one instruments are played at the same time in this sample :/
Do I do good thing or should I keep less tight with treating samples in my productions?

Thanks for any advice.
 
Messages
431
Likes
1
#2
your question is a little strangely
worded... but if i understand correctly...
in essence you are asking how do i
compose a melodic phrase and does it
have to harmonize with existing sounds...
if you want the 100% technically
correct answer... at least in regards
to western classical... study composition
and focus on counterpoint...
otherwise write what sounds good...
to you that is...
its writing music... and composition
and writing melodic and harmonic phrases
is a big part of it... the way you do this
will define you as a composer of music...
 

GiDriK

Lost in jungle
Messages
432
Likes
0
#3
your question is a little strangely
worded... but if i understand correctly...
in essence you are asking how do i
compose a melodic phrase and does it
have to harmonize with existing sounds...
if you want the 100% technically
correct answer... at least in regards
to western classical... study composition
and focus on counterpoint...
otherwise write what sounds good...
to you that is...
its writing music... and composition
and writing melodic and harmonic phrases
is a big part of it... the way you do this
will define you as a composer of music...
U JUST BLEW MY MIIIIND:rinsed:
 

kama

benkama.net
VIP Junglist
Messages
2,762
Likes
48
#4
You dont have to follow the same notes.

You can form different harmonies with varying the interval (the distance between 2 notes). for example C and G sound nice together.

google "ravenspiralguide.pdf" for some good info on music theory.
 
Messages
3
Likes
0
#5
@sook- you blew my mind too :p

Thanks @kama you explain me exactly what I wanted to know.

And two another questions from music theory-

1.Do I always have to keep with exactly ONE music scale when I'm composing song? I'm sorry it maybe sounds like a noob question but since I've started playing guitar (2 years) I really take notice on the music theory and maybe take this a little rigidly to my heart :p

2. It's about KICK drum- do I have to put it always with the bassline, I mean when bass starts playing some note the kick drum should starts simultaneously with that? Or can it be for example an eight note after it?

I hope you understand my little weirdy questions but I appreciate your help very much, cause you're in comparison with me DnB specs and I'm just a beginner. :)
 

kama

benkama.net
VIP Junglist
Messages
2,762
Likes
48
#6
1.Do I always have to keep with exactly ONE music scale when I'm composing song? I'm sorry it maybe sounds like a noob question but since I've started playing guitar (2 years) I really take notice on the music theory and maybe take this a little rigidly to my heart :p
Of course not. You can change scale if you want. It is a difficult thing to get to sound good however so just use your ears.

2. It's about KICK drum- do I have to put it always with the bassline, I mean when bass starts playing some note the kick drum should starts simultaneously with that? Or can it be for example an eight note after it?
This is absolutely up to you.If you think you need extra oomph, then by all means go ahead and start them both at the same time but it's not a rule you have to follow. Just keep in mind they're both rhythmical elements, laying down the base groove of the track.

Dont worry about any 'rules of dnb', just do what sounds good to you. That's what takes the scene forward.
 
Messages
3
Likes
0
#7
Thank you very much @kama for any explanation and particularly for that link to Ravenspiral Guide- it's really awesome and now I understand things which were a 'black hole' for me before.

And in the end one another question to all of you, just from natural curiosity- how do you recognize tonation of samples which you use, I mean which notes they contain? I personally use my guitar to help with that, play notes sequention and I really concentrate my ears to recognize following notes- it's pretty hard for me coz my ears aren't developed very well for now. :p I suppose there isn't any better idea that practising ears, what do you think?
 
Messages
134
Likes
0
#8
1.Do I always have to keep with exactly ONE music scale when I'm composing song? I'm sorry it maybe sounds like a noob question but since I've started playing guitar (2 years) I really take notice on the music theory and maybe take this a little rigidly to my heart :p
I think there is nothing u have to do in music, but distinct scales like major and minor are said to set up a distinct mood, major more happy, minor more sad. After hearing some of my fav songs from producer site i recognized, leads and pad seem to be on same scale, sometimes the same melody is made by in alternating instruments. So i think mostly it is used ONE scale.

2. It's about KICK drum- do I have to put it always with the bassline, I mean when bass starts playing some note the kick drum should starts simultaneously with that? Or can it be for example an eight note after it?
Something im also interested in, especially because in most tunes the subbass/bass besides the rhythm like kama said also transports a melody, i mean the pitch is not shifted on the drums (kick, snare) but in some slower atmospheric dnb songs the subbass has in besides rhythmical an melodic function, seem to be notes from simple chords of a scale.

Is there a musical theory for bass-like instruments out there? The harmonic theory is very useful for melodic instruments, but what up with melody and rhythm transporting instruments? I mean there are some obvious patterns like distinct bpm of ur drums will only admit distinct "bpm" of the bass, but thats pretty general.
 
Last edited:
Top