Two questions about ear fatigue

Discussion in 'Production' started by smoothassilk, Jun 6, 2015.

  1. smoothassilk

    smoothassilk Active Member

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    So, I've been working on a track for a long time.
    I ended up pretty happy with it but I reckon it's only because I've been through it so many times I can't hear the bad parts anymore.

    So:
    1. How do you guys stop yourself getting ear fatigue with a project that takes a long time?

    2. What specifically is wrong with this track? I really badly need a fresh pair of ears

     
  2. Mania

    Mania i fukin wot m8

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    Just listen at the right volumes
     
  3. Solace

    Solace Active Member

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    Just quit the project for a while. Focus on another project, stop producing for a few days, just don't listen to the track for a while.

    On the track: the whole mix needs a bit more cohesion. Everything sounds like a separate sound now, try the mend it all together
     
  4. EarlHiggsBoson

    EarlHiggsBoson New Member

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    Lots of a/b-ing against a tune of similar style that you like at different volumes can help.
     
  5. Neojunk

    Neojunk New Member

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    i'm listening a bit quieter than usually and turn it up only from time to time to make sure it sounds the way i want it to sound when
    it's played loud
    also take breaks: ~every 30-60 minutes for 5-10 minutes
    also i rather work on 3 songs for an hour each than 1 for 3 hours...

    when doing something that does not require audio (e.g. searching for a lost plugin or whatever...)
    stop the audio (you don't concentrate on it anyway...)
    i sometimes find myself tabbing into chrome and looking something up for 5 minutes while i have a snare drum hit looping
    in the background at a rather high volume... you definitly want to avoid that :D

    Edit: also stand up and listen to your song from a few meter behind the desk or even from another room + switch off your screen while doing so to gain a bit more objectivity...
     
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  6. smoothassilk

    smoothassilk Active Member

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    That's a new one on me: How?
     
  7. Solace

    Solace Active Member

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    You mean the second point I'm guessing?
    I'm not really sure why it feels that way. It just sounds like the different elements are to digital I guess, I think there's not enough organic or analogue stuff happening to mend everything together. Nothing is interfering, everything had it's place and that's good, but still, it might give the adhesion as a result.
    Maybe some fx, white noise, reverbs, stuff might help. I'm really not sure though, it might just be me too
     
  8. smoothassilk

    smoothassilk Active Member

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    Maybe this is where 'glue compression' comes in...the other thing that strikes me is that I could add some background noise, like ocean waves or vinyl noise or something, just very subtly
     
  9. Solace

    Solace Active Member

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    Some compression might help yea.
    And yes, that's something i do in all my track recently, grab a vinyl crack, ocean stuff, of like city ambient sound and high pass it. A lot. And it give a bit of high end rustle and a 'real feel'. Nu:tone mentioned this in his masterclass
     
  10. RUSSLA

    RUSSLA DNBF Monarch

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    Havent listened but a small amount of reverb on the master usually helps gel everything.
     
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  11. sam the dnb man

    sam the dnb man Variation

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    I've started doi
    I've been doing this a while although I use it as a last resort. Make sure you hi pass the verb as well as you can end up with muddy low end.
     
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  12. Interruptor

    Interruptor Member

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    This very much indeed - also you can have incredible phasing issues and stereo image going all nuts which is why I avoid it aswell.

    edit: avoid master reverbs aswell*
     
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  13. saganspirit

    saganspirit Member

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    Yeah that's why Ozone took the Reverb off their latest product I think. Voxengo Span is good to check phasing - also any good Goniometer should show it. Failing that, check your mix in Mono.
     
  14. sam the dnb man

    sam the dnb man Variation

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    Some master engineers use a slight touch of reverb. It can help gel elements together in a dry mix if done correctly
     
  15. Morah

    Morah Member

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    in response to the original question and to back up what some people said already.

    - always if your producing for a long time have the volume at a decent level, meaning not enough to piss off your girlfriend/mum ext
    - take regular breaks from the song so you don't get to used to what your hearing. supposedly it takes the hairs in your ears 1 week to return to normal after being bombarded by certain frequencys so eather work on another track or take a few days off.

    from a mixing point of view:

    - its good from time to time to put your volume so low you can only just hear the track. when you do this if you can hear the key points of the track then you know they need turning up in the mix. or on the flipside you can realy tell if a certain part is way to loud.
    a similar method can be done where you turn you music up and listen to it from outside you room. ( it gives you a different perspective on the mix )

    as far as your track is now.

    i like it but i think your drums could be mixed a little better. maybe the kick need more low end on it.
    also the guitar sounding synch at the start to me seems very loud compared to the rest at points, it might be worth putting some compression on it or it that doesn't work maybe try doing some volume automation to the high peaks.

    Hope that has helped and i haven't gone on to much :p

    Ben