Track Selection

Discussion in 'DJ's, MC's & Turntablism' started by 00000001, Jan 16, 2008.

  1. 00000001

    00000001 Member

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    I've recently come across a crossroads in my dj'ing. Trackselection, I find myself writing down all the track transitions and double drops I think work well. Alot of the times I see headliners doing flawless transitions and each song sounds great into the other. Take Friction for example (i know he's pretty much one of the top but), all of his transitions are beautiful and each song sounds like it was created to move into the next. I wonder, does every DJ keep a list or is it all in your head after dj'ing for (x amount of time)? Whats your method?
     
  2. safety

    safety double safety

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    big dj's know all about mixing in key which makes their track selection more informed you might say. but to your average layman dj's like us that will take a lot of time and effort to accomplish. i don't know how long you've been playing for, but my advice would be don't worry yourself about double drops andmixing in key till you make sure you mastered the basics. like beat matching and working the eq's, then over time work on learning what key all your records in (it's a big job) and that will take your mixing to the next level.
     
  3. In response to the original thread...Big Dj's do practice mixing tunes like the rest of us. They keep a mental log of which tunes sound good together - also to understand the stucture of the tune for double drops etc. Dont overcomplicate it by writing down mixes. I found by using 3 decks it gives you a fraction more time to select the next tune while the other two are in the mix. You still have to think and act relativley quick but it allows you to put the next tune in at points that you wouldn't have time to by just mixing on two decks. Just an idea for you mate. I've known Andy C for over 15 years now and i know for a fact he still practices mixes at home. with all the new dubs he cuts on a weekly basis he has to practice so he can to understand the tune and memorise the structure for when he plays it out. I'm sure you've heard him do the same mix before on different CD packs from different nights before??. Another trick...Andy sorts his tunes into piles when he plays....1 pile is usually teasers, 1 pile is new dubs, another - general tunes or classics for example....this allows you to quickly draw a tune that you have in mind for a particular mix, find it and quickly cue it up. Back to your original point though - DJing is best done on the fly - However - remebering some of your favourire mixes along the way and dropping them in your set is a good thing too.
     
  4. deadaelus

    deadaelus Laughter in the Slaughter

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    Although there are some really good suggestions made above, i support the .xls (microsoft excell spreadsheets) I note down mixes i like while i am doing my radio shows, and refer back to the .xls when i am getting ready to play a show

    I like to think of them like combos, similar to moves you make in video games like mortal kombat. Sometime combos happen when you drop a track in at a certain point, and sometime combos are just that the songs phase well together, or just key match. The benefit to building combos is that you can still have that crowd pleasing flexibility when you are playing live, and knock down a couple mixes you feel really comfortable & familiar with. The other benefit to building a combo list is that you can try things again and again, this will help you decide if they really work well or if it was just dumb luck that it sounded good the first time.

    SubsonicDJ makes a spectacular point on organizing your record box, this is crucial. Dividing your box into sections is key to controlling a crowd and building / breaking down momentum in your mixes. He says Andy C divides into teasers / Dubs / Classics. I personally dont use much teasers, and i definately dont have a lot of Dubs. So I like to organize by groove & style front to back: the front of the box is vocals & liquid tunes, then more boomy dancefloor stuff like Klute & Commix, then harder dancefloor stuff like Break & Subtitles, then the back is always tearin heavy tunes.

    Essentially you need to find what works best for you, there is a lot of really valuable information in this thread. Take it all in and find what you like best !!
     
    Last edited: Jan 17, 2008
  5. Toejam

    Toejam OOOBEY DOOBEY

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    i used to dj garage (i know:tut:) years ago but i practiced alot and i doubled dropped alot but never thought it came across natural

    Me and a good freind used to dj b2b and we just ripped it cos we were relaxed and took things as they came

    i remember a dj before us who was using cdj's whem they first came out actually had a notepad of what times to bring a tune in and had %of each tune to mix aswell

    made me piss myself laffin

    we plugged our 1210's in and smashed it cos we had confidence


    it comes mostly naturally that you know which tunes work with others but only thru practice


    trust meeeeeeeeeeeeeee!
     
  6. 00000001

    00000001 Member

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    Thanks for the advice guys. I guess the best thing or me to do is to just go out and practice a bunch. I practice alot, only been doing it for just over a year and play out sometimes already. I stick to what i know when i play out though, just so i don't make transitions that make peoples stomach turn or anything.
     
  7. Greg P

    Greg P Active Member

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    Subsonicdeejay gave some good advice there mate, practice practice practice, don't write anything down - soon you'll get a natural feel for what will and what wont go together - you'll know when you look the cover of a record whether it's right for the tune you're about to mix from. The advice about piles is good too, I do something quite similar, I think a lot of people do...

    One thing though, a lot of time it's about EQ'ing - EQ it so that you're just bringing in the frequencies that aren't going to interefere with the track you're playin, then when you go for the drop tweak em around the other way or something - if you watch top class DJ's you'll see that they EQ all the time - you wanna be doing the same, half the mix is done with the cross fader, the other half with the EQ
     
  8. ScottyEightSix

    ScottyEightSix HUGE EARS > COMEDY CHIN

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  9. Dj-Pezzz

    Dj-Pezzz HangOutWithYourWangOut

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    This form of mixing in the "same key" is sometimes known as harmonic mixing..its hard to grasp your head around though for dj's who have no previous musical or theoretical experience....(not that im trying to be bigheaded or anythin)....but i've played classical piano and drums from an early age, so when i started dj-ing and learnt the basics...this idea of harmonic mixing came easier to me...like subsonic said...Andy C often mixes tracks in the same key because they work so well...