The special relationship is going global

Discussion in 'Waffle' started by KEMZ, Mar 5, 2009.

  1. KEMZ

    KEMZ Blatant Royal Status

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    Speech by Gordon Brown: http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/comment/columnists/guest_contributors/article5821821.ece

    'Historians will look back and say this was no ordinary time but a defining moment: an unprecedented period of global change, and a time when one chapter ended and another began.

    The scale and the speed of the global banking crisis has at times been almost overwhelming, and I know that in countries everywhere people who rely on their banks for savings have been feeling powerless and afraid. But it is when times become harder and challenges greater that across the world countries must show vision, leadership and courage – and, while we can do a great deal nationally, we can do even more working together internationally.

    So now is the time for leaders of every country in the world to work together to agree the action that will see us through the current crisis and ensure we come out stronger. And there is no international partnership in recent history that has served the world better than the special relationship between Britain and the United States.

    It is a relationship that has endured and flourished because it is based not simply on our shared history but on the enduring values that bind us together – our countries founded upon liberty, our histories forged through democracy and an unshakeable belief in the power of enterprise and opportunity.

    But if it reflects our values and our histories, this special relationship is also a partnership of purpose, renewed by every generation to reflect the challenges we face. In the 1940s it found its full force defeating fascism and building the postwar international order; in the cold war era we fought the growth of nuclear weapons and when the Berlin Wall fell we saw the end of communism. In this new century, since the horrors visited on America in 2001, we have worked in partnership to defeat terrorism.

    Now, in this generation, we must renew our work together once again. A new set of challenges faces the whole world, which summons forth the need for a partnership of purpose that must involve the whole world. Rebuilding global financial stability is a global challenge that needs global solutions. However, financial instability is but one of the challenges that globalisation brings. Our task in working together is to secure a high-growth, low-carbon recovery by taking seriously the global challenge of climate change. And our efforts must be to work for a more stable world where we defeat not only global terrorism but global poverty, hunger and disease.

    Globalisation has brought great advances, lifting millions out of poverty as they reap the benefits of economic growth and trade. But it has also brought new insecurities, as this – the first truly global financial crisis – underlines. Globalisation is not an option, it is a fact, so the question is whether we manage it well or badly.

    I believe there is no challenge so great or so difficult that it cannot be overcome by America, Britain and the world working together. That is why President Obama and I will discuss this week a global new deal, whose impact can stretch from the villages of Africa to reforming the financial institutions of London and New York– and giving security to the hard-working families in every country.

    I see this global new deal as an agreement that every continent injects resources into its economy. I believe that central to this new investment is that every country backs a green recovery for the future, that every country that wishes to participate in the international financial system agrees common principles for financial regulation, coordinated internationally, and changes to their own banking system that will bring us shared prosperity once again. And that, together, we must agree to reform the mandate and governance of global institutions to recognise the changing shape of the world economy and the emergence of new players.

    It is a global new deal that will lay the foundations not just fora sustainable economic recovery but for a genuinely new era of international partnership in which all countries have a part to play. This programme of internationally coordinated actions includes six elements:

    First, universal action to prevent the crisis spreading, to stimulate the global economy and to help reduce the severity and length of the global recession. Second, action to kick-start lending so that families and businesses can borrow again. Third, all countries renouncing protectionism, with a transparent mechanism to monitor commitments. Fourth, reform of international regulation to close regulatory gaps so shadow banking systems have nowhere to hide. Fifth, reform of our international financial institutions and the creation of an international early warning system. And last, coordinated international action to build tomorrow today – putting the world economy on an economically, environmentally and socially sustainable path towards future growth and recovery.

    I have always been an Atlanticist and a great admirer of the American spirit of enterprise and national purpose. I have visited America many times and have many friends there, and as prime minister I want to do more to strengthen even further our relationship with America.

    Winston Churchill described the joint inheritance of Britain and America as not just a shared history but a shared belief in the great principles of freedom and the rights of man – what Barack Obama has described as the enduring power of our ideals – democracy, liberty, opportunity and unyielding hope. Britain and America may be separated by the thousands of miles of the Atlantic, but we are united by shared values that can never be broken. And as America stands at its own dawn of hope, I want that hope to be fulfilled through us all coming together to shape the 21st century as the first century of a truly global society'.


    Brown is the biggest most shameless liar on the planet bar none.

    When will someone give us the full story of those holidays he spent on Cape Cod with Kennedy,
    Kerry, Clinton etc in the early nineties when they all dreamt up that scam involving robbing the future through toxic mortgages to create fake prosperity in the present.

    DEBT-PUSHER

    VOTE-WHORE

    POVERTY-PIMP

    The arrogant and hyperactively destructive Brown may well be responsible for all of it. I can not believe he has returned to the scene of the crime in order to ‘help’ the police. He’s a serial psycho.
     
  2. spiderfran286

    spiderfran286 "Yes, squid pro roe..."

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    oh no, not all that "illuminati" crap again
    u gunna post about 15 pages again?

    u really think ppl wud pre plan this?
     
  3. KEMZ

    KEMZ Blatant Royal Status

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    this has nothing to do with that, just read it. i fuckin hate Gordon Brown!!!!!!
     
  4. spiderfran286

    spiderfran286 "Yes, squid pro roe..."

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    ive read it, i think its a pretty good speech, but i wud say that, seen as im one of the 12 heads of the world , but shhhh i didnt let the cat out of the bag
     
  5. Controller

    Controller (╯'□')╯︵ ┻━┻

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    I'v not read enough about these theories to comment appropriately, but if the global currency idea is introduced, surely all the economies that rely on the exchange rate to make money and grow will just completely collapse :confused:
     
  6. Blurr

    Blurr Wasted Selection

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    :lol:

    but on a serious note Brown is a legend imo, great speech yesterday, possibly the best from a PM in the US, especially considered he isn't the best aurator
     
  7. spiderfran286

    spiderfran286 "Yes, squid pro roe..."

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    i wasnt beefing, just saying did he really think this was pre-planned?
    cuz he said this.....


    and i agree with you, never b4 has a PM made such an impact in the U.S
     
  8. Blurr

    Blurr Wasted Selection

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    there ain't many businesses that rely on exchange rates except those changing currency, but a global currency is not a good idea imo, the euros already getting a bit fucked, for example euros made in Italy are worth less than French or German ones, and it means alot of ppl are crossing borders to get better deals taking the bottom out of their local economy
     
  9. deadaelus

    deadaelus Laughter in the Slaughter

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    I like how he talks about teaming up and defeating fascism.

    Please read this to understand the definition of fascism, and think to yourself if you would agree that fascism has been defeated.

    Fascism and You!



    The 14 Characteristics of Fascism

    by Lawrence Britt

    Free Inquiry magazine

    Spring 2003



    Political scientist Dr. Lawrence Britt recently wrote an article about fascism ("Fascism Anyone?," Free Inquiry , Spring 2003, page 20). Studying the fascist regimes of Hitler (Germany), Mussolini (Italy), Franco (Spain), Suharto (Indonesia), and Pinochet (Chile), Dr. Britt found they all had 14 elements in common. He calls these the identifying characteristics of fascism. The excerpt is in accordance with the magazines policy.


    The 14 characteristics are:


    1. Powerful and Continuing Nationalism

    Fascist regimes tend to make constant use of patriotic mottos, slogans, symbols, songs, and other paraphernalia. Flags are seen everywhere, as are flag symbols on clothing and in public displays.


    2. Disdain for the Recognition of Human Rights

    Because of fear of enemies and the need for security, the people in fascist regimes are persuaded that human rights can be ignored in certain cases because of "need." The people tend to look the other way or even approve of torture, summary executions, assassinations, long incarcerations of prisoners, etc.


    3. Identification of Enemies/Scapegoats as a Unifying Cause

    The people are rallied into a unifying patriotic frenzy over the need to eliminate a perceived common threat or foe: racial , ethnic or religious minorities; liberals; communists; socialists, terrorists, etc.


    4. Supremacy of the Military

    Even when there are widespread domestic problems, the military is given a disproportionate amount of government funding, and the domestic agenda is neglected. Soldiers and military service are glamorized.


    5. Rampant Sexism

    The governments of fascist nations tend to be almost exclusively male-dominated. Under fascist regimes, traditional gender roles are made more rigid. Opposition to abortion is high, as is homophobia and anti-gay legislation and national policy.


    6. Controlled Mass Media

    Sometimes to media is directly controlled by the government, but in other cases, the media is indirectly controlled by government regulation, or sympathetic media spokespeople and executives. Censorship, especially in war time, is very common.


    7. Obsession with National Security

    Fear is used as a motivational tool by the government over the masses.


    8. Religion and Government are Intertwined

    Governments in fascist nations tend to use the most common religion in the nation as a tool to manipulate public opinion. Religious rhetoric and terminology is common from government leaders, even when the major tenets of the religion are diametrically opposed to the governments policies or actions.


    9. Corporate Power is Protected

    The industrial and business aristocracy of a fascist nation often are the ones who put the government leaders into power, creating a mutually beneficial business/government relationship and power elite.


    10. Labor Power is Suppressed

    Because the organizing power of labor is the only real threat to a fascist government, labor unions are either eliminated entirely, or are severely suppressed.


    11. Disdain for Intellectuals and the Arts

    Fascist nations tend to promote and tolerate open hostility to higher education, and academia. It is not uncommon for professors and other academics to be censored or even arrested. Free expression in the arts is openly attacked, and governments often refuse to fund the arts.


    12. Obsession with Crime and Punishment

    Under fascist regimes, the police are given almost limitless power to enforce laws. The people are often willing to overlook police abuses and even forego civil liberties in the name of patriotism. There is often a national police force with virtually unlimited power in fascist nations.


    13. Rampant Cronyism and Corruption

    Fascist regimes almost always are governed by groups of friends and associates who appoint each other to government positions and use governmental power and authority to protect their friends from accountability. It is not uncommon in fascist regimes for national resources and even treasures to be appropriated or even outright stolen by government leaders.


    14. Fraudulent Elections

    Sometimes elections in fascist nations are a complete sham. Other times elections are manipulated by smear campaigns against or even assassination of opposition candidates, use of legislation to control voting numbers or political district boundaries, and manipulation of the media. Fascist nations also typically use their judiciaries to manipulate or control elections.
     
  10. Blurr

    Blurr Wasted Selection

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    it's cool, just read these 2 threads 1st, made me chortle a little
     
  11. Controller

    Controller (╯'□')╯︵ ┻━┻

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    Importing & Exporting is a huge industry, and relies on exchange rates does it not?
     
  12. Blurr

    Blurr Wasted Selection

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    it only relies on exchange rates because we have different currencies and the rates fluctuate, so when the dollar is weak against the pound it's better to import to the UK from the US tha it is to export the other way round, if every country had the same currency then this would take it out the equation, so you'd only have to take in to account the worth of the product in UK and then the value in the US, then u get into economies of scale and supply and demand...

    most money made off exchange rates is made from very very wealthy business men who just shift their money around through different currencies, getting lots of dollars when it's weak, selling them for yen when it's strong again, maybe then into euros etc...
     
  13. Controller

    Controller (╯'□')╯︵ ┻━┻

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    seen jimmy bean.
     
  14. DontLikeCops

    DontLikeCops Certified tramp

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    i think its a shame his other eye still works...