the god book for dnb production . have at it friends

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#1
i came arcoss a helpfull tool from afriend of mine dan.c and ima share it with you all this thing is gold so use it with love

(SICKorWELL )
URBAN-ANARCHY-RECORDS/DEADant/KillaSound USA/Flowchart productions

checkout the new tunes
myspace.com/sickorwell


PART I – Instruments and EQ


Kick Drum

Any apparent muddiness can be rolled off around 300 Hz. Try a small boost around 5-7 kHz to add some high end.

60-100 Hz ~ Adds bottom to the sound
100-250 Hz ~ Adds fullness
250-800 Hz ~ Muddiness area
2.5 kHz ~ Slap attack
5-8 kHz ~ Adds high end presence
8-12 kHz ~ Adds hiss and rattle


Snare

Try a small boost around 60-120 Hz if the sound is a little too wimpy. Try boosting around 6 kHz for that 'snappy' sound. Snares are often the driving force of dnb and they take on so many forms that it really comes down to "time spent" here. Experimentation is the key... but here are general guidelines:

220-260 Hz ~ Fatness
5 kHz ~ Crispness
6-8 kHz ~ Adds presence


Hi hats or cymbals

Any apparent muddiness can be rolled off around 300 Hz. To add some brightness try a small boost around 3 kHz.

200Hz ~ Clank or gong sound
250-800 Hz ~ Muddiness area
1-6 kHz ~ Adds presence
6-8 kHz ~ Adds shimmer and clarity
8-12 kHz ~ Adds brightness


Rack Toms

240 Hz ~ Fullness
5 kHz ~ Crack / smack attack


Floor Toms

80-120 Hz ~ Fullness
5 kHz ~ Crack / smack attack


Bass Guitar

Try boosting around 60 Hz to add more body. Any apparent muddiness can be rolled off around 300 Hz. If more presence is needed, boost around 6 kHz. Most of this will apply to any bassline.

50-100 Hz ~ Adds bottom end
100-250 Hz ~ Adds fullness
250-700 Hz ~ Muddiness Area
700-1000 Hz ~ Pluck sound
2.5 kHz ~ String noise / pop
3-6 kHz ~ Adds presence
6-8 kHz ~ Adds high-end presence
8-12 kHz ~ Adds hiss


Vocals

This is a difficult one, as it depends on the mic used to record the vocal. However...Apply either cut or boost around 300 Hz, depending on the mic and song. Apply a very small boost around 6 kHz to add some clarity.

100-250 Hz ~ Adds 'up-frontness' / boom
250-800 Hz ~ Muddiness area
2-6 kHz ~ Adds presence
6-8 kHz ~ Adds sibilance and clarity
8-12 kHz ~ Adds brightness


Piano

Any apparent muddiness can be rolled off around 300 Hz. Apply a very small boost around 6 kHz to add some clarity.

80-120 Hz ~ Adds bottom
120-250 Hz ~ Adds body
250-1 kHz ~ Muddiness area
2.5-5 kHz ~ Adds presence
6-8 kHz ~ Adds clarity
10 kHz ~ Crisp attack
12-14 kHz ~ Adds hiss


Electric guitars

Again this depends on the mix and the recording. Apply either cut or boost around 300 Hz, depending on the song and sound. Try boosting around 3 kHz to add some edge to the sound, or cut to add some transparency. Try boosting around 6 kHz to add presence. Try boosting around 10 kHz to add brightness.

200-250 Hz ~ Adds fullness
250-800 Hz ~ Muddiness area
2.5 kHz ~ Adds bite
5-8 kHz ~ Adds clarity
8-12 kHz ~ Adds hiss


Acoustic guitar

Any apparent muddiness can be rolled off between 100-300 Hz. Apply small amounts of cut around 1-3 kHz to push the image higher. Apply small amounts of boost around 5 kHz to add some presence.

80-120 Hz ~ Bottom end
120-250 Hz ~ Adds body
2.5-5 kHz ~ Adds clarity
8-12 kHz ~ Adds brightness


Horns

There are many types of horns and EQ will affect each in drastically different ways. Here’s a few common EQ affects for most types of horns.

120-240 Hz ~ Fullness
5-7.5 kHz ~ Shrillness


Strings

These depend entirely on the mix and the sound used.

50-100 Hz ~ Adds bottom end
250 Hz ~ Adds fullness
250-800 Hz ~ Muddiness area
1-6 kHz ~ Sounds crunchy
7.5-10 kHz ~ Scratchiness
11-14 kHz ~ Adds brightness



PART II – Frequencies and Domains


50 Hz

1. Increase to add more fullness to lowest frequency instruments like foot, toms, and the bass.
2. Reduce to decrease the "boom" of the bass and will increase overtones and the recognition of bass line in the mix. This is most often used on bass lines in Rap and R&B.


100 Hz

1. Increase to add a harder bass sound to lowest frequency instruments.
2. Increase to add fullness to guitars, snare.
3. Increase to add warmth to piano and horns.
4. Reduce to remove boom on guitars & increase clarity.


200 Hz

1. Increase to add fullness to vocals.
2. Increase to add fullness to snare and guitar (harder sound).
3. Reduce to decrease muddiness of vocals or mid-range instruments.
4. Reduce to decrease gong sound of cymbals.


400 Hz

1. Increase to add clarity to bass lines especially when speakers are at low volume.
2. Reduce to decrease "cardboard" sound of lower drums (foot and toms).
3. Reduce to decrease ambiance on cymbals.


800 Hz

1. Increase for clarity and "punch" of bass.
2. Reduce to remove "cheap" sound of guitars


1.5 kHz

1. Increase for "clarity" and "pluck" of bass.
2. Reduce to remove dullness of guitars.


3 kHz

1. Increase for more "pluck" of bass.
2. Increase for more attack of electric / acoustic guitar.
3. Increase for more attack on low piano parts.
4. Increase for more clarity / hardness on voice.
5. Reduce to increase breathy, soft sound on background vocals.
6. Reduce to disguise out-of-tune vocals / guitars


5 kHz

1. Increase for vocal presence.
2. Increase low frequency drum attack (foot/toms).
3. Increase for more "finger sound" on bass.
4. Increase attack of piano, acoustic guitar and brightness on guitars.
5. Reduce to make background parts more distant.
6. Reduce to soften "thin" guitar.


7 kHz

1. Increase to add attack on low frequency drums (more metallic sound).
2. Increase to add attack to percussion instruments.
3. Increase on dull singer.
4. Increase for more "finger sound" on acoustic bass.
5. Reduce to decrease sibilance (the “s”) on vocals.
6. Increase to add sharpness to synthesizers, rock guitars, acoustic guitar and piano.


10 kHz

1. Increase to brighten vocals.
2. Increase for "light brightness" in acoustic guitar and piano.
3. Increase for hardness on cymbals.
4. Reduce to decrease sibilance (the “s”) on vocals.


15 kHz

1. Increase to brighten vocals (breath sound).
2. Increase to brighten cymbals, string instruments and flutes.
3. Increase to make sampled synthesizer sound more real.



EQ Applications and Understanding


Although most equalization is done by ear, it’s helpful to have an idea about which frequencies affect an instrument in order to achieve and particular effect (hence my tables above). Let’s start at the very beginning: what is frequency? Frequency is the wavelength of sound. That is to say, it is the rate at which a sound wave completes a cycle of positive and negative amplitude. The number of cycles that occurs in one full second is the frequency of a sound wave and that is measured in Hertz (Hz). You will also frequently see the term Kilohertz (kHz) used when talking about sound waves; 1 kHz is equal to 1000 Hz.

When sound waves overlap they combine into a new wave and the frequencies interfere, enhance, and cancel each other. This is where equalization (EQ) comes into play. Equalizers allow you to control the frequencies of sound and thus allow you to shape your music so it sounds better (or worse). It is not enough to just have a bunch of great samples and sounds and throw them together thinking it will sound good. Once sounds overlap they change each other and you must be able to control that change or you end up with a sonic mess. Equalization will allow you to cut and boost certain frequencies within each of your sounds/instruments so that they do not interfere with each other (at least not as much).

On the whole the audio spectrum can be divided into four frequency bands: LOW (20-200Hz), LOW-MIDDLE (200-1000Hz), HIGH-MIDDLE (1-5kHz), and HIGH (5-20kHz):



LOW: 20-200 Hz

This range is often known as the sub bass and is most commonly taken up by the lowest part of the kick drum and bass guitar; although at these frequencies it's almost impossible to determine any pitch. Anything below 40 Hz is not heard at all by human ears but can be felt, especially in the chest. Sub bass is one of the reasons why 12" vinyl became available: low frequencies require wider grooves than high frequencies - without rolling off everything below 50 Hz you couldn't fit a full track onto a 7" vinyl record. However I do NOT recommend applying any form of boost around this area without the use of very high quality studio monitors (not home monitors - there is a vast difference between home near-field and studio far-field monitors costing anywhere between $5,000 and $20,000). Boosting blindly in this area without a valid reference point can and will permanently damage most speakers, even PA systems. You have been warned!


LOW-MIDDLE: 200-1000 Hz

This is the range you're adjusting when applying bass boost in the upper ranges to add some presence or clarity to your low end instruments. This is also the main culprit area for muddy sounding mixes. Most frequencies around here can cause psycho-acoustic problems: if too many sounds in a mix are dominating this area, a track can quickly become annoying.


HIGH-MIDDLE: 1-5 kHz

Human hearing is extremely sensitive at these frequencies, and even a minute boost around here will result in a huge change in the sound (almost the same as if you boosted around 10 dB at any other range). This is because our voices are centered in this area, so it's the frequency range we hear more than any other. Most telephones work at 3 kHz, because at this frequency speech is most intelligible.

i hope you all use to your good theres more so for full info hit me up ay myspace.com/sickorwell

from SICKorWELL TO YOU ALL
 

subprime

Dysjoint
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#5
I have exactly NO idea what any of this means so I guess that means I have to read it AGAIN and thanks. Nice one.
 

Radius

Full Spectrum Selection
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#7
Good starter, but not every sound is the same, so use ya ears as a guide too ..innit..this ain't a produce by numbers guide

Ha ha

What I would love to see is something similar from some like Beau or Stu (you'll see their name on a lot of vinyls if you look carefull enough)..they are the mastering engineers at two of the top mastering places DnB uses.....
I think a warm valve mastering compressor...oh and one of the SSL rack mount eq plugin things that cost a grand...would be a good start too...and while your at it send me a sexy babe round to ahem "inspire " me thanks ..oh shit thought i was typin my note to Santa there.'..oi oi
 

sam the dnb man

Variation
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#11
this all depends on the sample/hit recorded.
also what it was recorded on...if it was run through any hardware and or the angles of mic.

alsorts a shitt dawg
 

sotalex

man your battlestations
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#13
maybe sounds like a dumb question but if you say something like 'Try boosting around 6 kHz', do you mean a boost in volume or a bass boost or...?
 

subprime

Dysjoint
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#14
I understand it as: insert a graphic equaliser, specify the frequency for your boost (eg kick drum- 100hz), boost by x db, adjust Q to drag in surrounding frequencies or not.
So that will boost the specified frequencies above the others, allowing the sound to punch through the mix.
 

mistasfx

MISTA SFX
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#18
i wouldnt wet ur pants over this guide if i were you...

remember u cant polish a turd.

best advice i ever got told was start with a snare that is punchy/snappy, start with a kick that is thuddy etc etc and eq from there!!

Dont expect to get a weak shitty snare and eq it up to the best punchiest snare ever!
 

MARKLAR

International Tracksuit Salesman
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#19
i wouldnt wet ur pants over this guide if i were you...

remember u cant polish a turd.

best advice i ever got told was start with a snare that is punchy/snappy, start with a kick that is thuddy etc etc and eq from there!!

Dont expect to get a weak shitty snare and eq it up to the best punchiest snare ever!
actually u can polish a turd!
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hBj6PonX14A
 
Messages
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#20
i wouldnt wet ur pants over this guide if i were you...

remember u cant polish a turd.

best advice i ever got told was start with a snare that is punchy/snappy, start with a kick that is thuddy etc etc and eq from there!!

Dont expect to get a weak shitty snare and eq it up to the best punchiest snare ever!
yea you can polish a turd if you make them lol but i sure the tunes ive been getting released are far from turds . the point of the post is to have more of a idea of sound manipulation . i sure evrey one understands that . check out the tunes myspace.com/sickorwell
 
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