Sub Bass

Discussion in 'Production' started by Matt Carter, Jun 19, 2017.

  1. Matt Carter

    Matt Carter New Member

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    Afternoon everyone,

    I am new here so this probably has been covered off someone else, so feel free to send a link.

    Basically I have been producing for around 6 months, I am still getting to grips with bass design and its probably my worst part of my production.

    I am struggling with getting sub basses that are warm and gritty for example tracks like

    - Technimatic - Parallel

    I was wondering if anyone would mind sharing some tips/ techniques

    I know its all about playing about until you find what you want but a point in the right direction would be highly appreciated.

    Thanks
    Matt
     
  2. ed_snap

    ed_snap New Member

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    low pass 2 detuned saw waves ( aka reese ) or low pass a square wave, or low pass 2 detuned squarewaves
     
  3. djdizzy

    djdizzy Active Member

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    ^ I think OP is just asking about sub bass, I don't think he's asking about midrange bass.

    I've always heard to lowpass a sine (most common) or square, no others. Saws are only used for harmonics on the sub bass, a one oscillator saw wave that's layered on top of the uh bass, saturating/etc the saw, hipass it to cut out sub frequencies. IME I've found that to be true.

    I've always read to use a limiter/expander on the sub bass instead of a compressor. I've had good results with using a compressor even though that's not a best practice. A lot of subtractive EQ'ing if you only want clean sub bass that you feel and not hear, I'd say use a one oscillator sine wave. Feel free to use a 2nd oscillator (also sine) but only if you don't detune them from each other, you'd want the waveforms to be in phase with each other so they're lined up and all it does is make the sound louder. With an EQ, use a lowpass filter remove all the frequencies higher than the sub bass frequency band.

    You can get a great sub bass wobble by detuning the 2nd oscillator sine wave by a couple semitones, depending what key you're playing in.