Sub bass - sorry for maybe obvious question

EvezDroppin

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ez guys.

im not asking here to get a sub bass sound im asking more for ur techniques on layering the sub beneath ur bass.

If your bass is morphing with LFO's etc then you're going to want your sub to do that too....

In the past I have used thor and for simpler tracks liquid for example iv had a flat sub behind the track where as Ive also had a sub with the lfo/filter modulated the same as bass so it sounds inform.

How do u guys do it, im moving over to massive.... might use thor too... whats the best way to make the sub.?

---------- Post added at 12:14 ---------- Previous post was at 12:13 ----------

what im asking is... realise it may not be clear.

if in massive can i coppy the modulation for the lfo etc to the sub automation channel (im new to studio one)
 
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#2
You can do it any way you want, you don't have to modulate the sub to match your bass, lots of tracks don't.

If you have a rather complex bass patch, with pitch modulation, then save it then open a new version and change the oscillators to sine and turn off all filters. Then you have a sub that will follow the lead bass sound.
 

ARTFX

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Yeahhh I tend to use a flat sub with my wobbles, I kind of like it better then with the wobble on the sub.. It loses it's heavyness that way I think..
 

groelle

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Yeahhh I tend to use a flat sub with my wobbles, I kind of like it better then with the wobble on the sub.. It loses it's heavyness that way I think..
obvious heavyness, yeah. but volume changes still make A LOT of difference. imagine a bassline thats a straight d at the same volume all the time vs one that goes up and down in volume all the time, for example always peaking on the one.

while maybe the first one SHOULD be heavier because theres "more" bass - the second one could still sound heavier because you get to notice the volume way more because its silence in between - if you get what i mean, lol. kinda hard to describe right now :D
 

EvezDroppin

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obvious heavyness, yeah. but volume changes still make A LOT of difference. imagine a bassline thats a straight d at the same volume all the time vs one that goes up and down in volume all the time, for example always peaking on the one.

while maybe the first one SHOULD be heavier because theres "more" bass - the second one could still sound heavier because you get to notice the volume way more because its silence in between - if you get what i mean, lol. kinda hard to describe right now :D
i know what ur saying groelle and agree...

sometimes a flat sub doesnt sound right imo, more for the techy/minimal tracks, having a flat sub is not going to work
 

ARTFX

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i know what ur saying groelle and agree...

sometimes a flat sub doesnt sound right imo, more for the techy/minimal tracks, having a flat sub is not going to work
Yeah I totally agree, most of my tracks are pretty filthy so I like to use the flat sub for that. Whenever I'm doing more minimal stuff I like to keep the wobble in there, it really depends on your needs.
 
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