Spectral Analysation

Discussion in 'Production' started by mini_molko, Jul 7, 2010.

  1. mini_molko

    mini_molko Member

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2008
    Messages:
    384
    Likes Received:
    0
    This may be a bit of a noob question, but does anyone else find that when they look at their track through a spectral analyser, the lower frequencies tend to be of a higher DB compared to the higher frequencies?

    I was just wondering because whenever I feel I have produced a track where all the frequencies are hitting at the right volume for me, if I look at it through the analyser, the low end is pumping out at a much higher DB than the rest of the track. Is this due to the fact that our perception of bass is harder to define than higher frequencies, or is this just a case of crap production ears/speakers?

    I've tried lowering the volume of the low end so that it levels out with the other frequencies, but it always ends up sounding too quiet in the mix... :confused:
     
  2. ItsLambyBiatch

    ItsLambyBiatch New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2008
    Messages:
    21
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Birmingham, UK
    I notice this, but always put it down to having crap speakers and headphones...
     
  3. mini_molko

    mini_molko Member

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2008
    Messages:
    384
    Likes Received:
    0
    Me too, I have to do all my production through my shitty hi-fi, so I assumed it may be down to not being able to hear a clear and reliable representation of the sound. Although, saying that, I've tried and tested a few of my songs out on a proper soundsystem at a few gigs, and the bass has never come across too heavy in the mix.

    Definitely looking into getting some proper monitors once I've got the cash.
     
  4. groelle

    groelle Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2007
    Messages:
    5,498
    Likes Received:
    92
    Location:
    northern germany
    its about our hearing. bass frequencys are heard less than higher, therefore you have to turn them way up to make them noticable. try mixing down at around 80db, as thats were we hear best, ie the flattest frequency response curve, and try not to focus too much on the analyzing.

    in a normal dnb song id say the kick and the bass have to hit at more or less the same percieved loudness, to get the energy desired.

    and theres nothing better for checking a sub than a big pa obviously. if you dont got that, check through good headphones at least.

    and notice: better to have someone turn the bass up, then someone who has to turn it down..
     
  5. kama

    kama benkama.net

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2002
    Messages:
    2,768
    Likes Received:
    48
    Location:
    Halfway between the gutter and stars
    It's a thing about dance music being very bass oriented compared to, say, grunge or something - with real instruments there is rarely anything spectacular under 60-70Hz, mainly some thud from the bass drum, and only if it's a pro recording.

    There is no 'sub bass' per se in modern music other than the dance scene. Why would there be something that can only be heard on the dancefloor?

    Also there is a something called the Fletcher-Munson curve that dictates that bass notes must be in reality louder in order to be perceived as loud as higher notes. It's the brain working that way. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fletcher%E2%80%93Munson_curves
     
  6. groelle

    groelle Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2007
    Messages:
    5,498
    Likes Received:
    92
    Location:
    northern germany
    kama bringing the knowledge once again. forgot how that curve was called, thanks ;)
     
  7. CH3SH

    CH3SH CH3SH - Naphalm Audio

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2008
    Messages:
    462
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Bury St. Edmunds
    Im a big fan of spectral analysis,
    Used to use it before i had my monitors
    Due to personal preference i use Roger Nicholls one,
    Like Kama says your ear will only pick up certain frequencies clearer
    High mid range is more broader than others
    But due to frequency cycles, high freqs will hit your ears quicker than lower freqs
    Use this interactive frequency chart to understand it a little more
    (Ear Sensitivity chart on lower right)
    Which is one reason why alotta producers will frequency range each samples or synth used to ear (via monitors)
    Mainly to free up frequencies that you ears cant hear
    This then gives other hits, samples, synths etc more headroom and stops frequencies overlapping and flooding through the misery range (120-350 Hz)
    Hope this helps =]

    http://www.independentrecording.net/irn/resources/freqchart/main_display.htm