Drum & Bass sidechaining snare

Discussion in 'Production' started by Kopacetic, Dec 17, 2013.

  1. Kopacetic

    Kopacetic Member

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    Is it recommended to certain sounds to the snare? I have been watching lots of videos about music production, and one person said to only sidechain everything to the kick. However, would the snare need sidechain, especially when a sound with lots of high frequencies starts playing, or a sound in the low mid frequencies so the punch can be heard?
     
  2. Dugg Funnie

    Dugg Funnie Well-Known Member

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    Ya, occasionally I'll frequency split a sound specifically to sidechain the low-mid region to my snare drum so a lot of the "thud" comes through for extra beef, gotta play it by ear imo.
     
  3. Optimal Prime

    Optimal Prime Specialising in the arts and crafts of Drum & Bass

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    This is one thing I always forget to try out. I think if you are looking for a heavy Snare, then it's going to be beneficial, because you can push out other frequencies. Things like white noise layers and pads, atmospheres will be most noticeable to duck. Best to just try out different things.

    I don't understand why someone would say to ONLY sidechain to the kick. It's got uses outside of this. The most common use is for a kick against bass, granted, but you could use it on say a lead vocalist against an instrument, or backing vocals. It's just purely to give priority to what ever you want to stand out more. In DnB, the kick the bass and Snare are usually the main focuses. Using it more extreme tends to give you more of an artistic effect and works well in the right track.
     
  4. Mania

    Mania i fukin wot m8

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    usually sounds dont interfere with the snare much, so people tend to not sidechain anything with it. But what some dancey dnb does do is have the bass get ducked by the snare to get a more pumping sound.
    When the bass is getting ducked by the snare and the kick, it creates an extreme pumping effect.

    KI does this sometimes
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 12, 2015
  5. Matthew-B

    Matthew-B New Member

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    What i do instead of traditional sidechaining - I put EQ on bass+midrange channel, and set one band to main kick frequencies and one for main snare frequencies. For example 80khz and 250khz, but i leave gain on 0. Then I automate those bands, when kick is hitting then 80khz on bass is cutted drastically, but only for moment, like sidechain. And when snare hits, than i cut only something about 250khz from midrange. In this technique your frequencies dont interfere, you get subtle pumping, but midrange is still clarity.
     
  6. Deekay[AUS]

    Deekay[AUS] Buffy's Bedtime Slayer

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    You're talking about gating what ever the snare clashes with?
     
  7. Gloxxy

    Gloxxy I SNORT COAL

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    Breakage did this with the Ain't Nobody remix.

    Sidechained both kick and snare to everything else in the mix.

     
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 12, 2015
  8. Deekay[AUS]

    Deekay[AUS] Buffy's Bedtime Slayer

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    So did BC UK with Ladies of Spain. Weirdest mixdown everrrrrr