Reverb

Discussion in 'Production' started by dexter, Aug 28, 2009.

  1. dexter

    dexter Member

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    Hey all,

    when do YOU use reverb?
     
  2. Sweaty Teddy

    Sweaty Teddy Nob'ed

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    on most stuff to make it sound less flat,]
     
  3. sook

    sook Member

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    little bits on almost everything...
    one long... one short...
    set the stereo width ultra wide...
    maybe eq a lil...
     
  4. Hightech

    Hightech Member

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  5. safety

    safety double safety

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    i use it everyday. once before breakfast and twice with my evening meal
     
  6. dj_bmc

    dj_bmc Member

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    I seem to spend more time turning reverb off than i do putting it on, anyone who uses Combinator patches/Predator VST knows what i'm saying.
     
  7. Stream

    Stream New Member

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    Depends if I need a 'tail' on a sound.
     
  8. TongueFlap

    TongueFlap Flappin'

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    Taken from SOS


    Artificial reverb is an integral part of music production, as it puts back the sense of space and place that's removed by close-miking voices and instruments in an acoustically dead studio. In the real world, reverb is created by sounds reflecting and re-reflecting from surfaces in an enclosed or partially enclosed space, and the resulting pattern of sound is infinitely complex. The geometry of the space and the materials from which it is made affect both the pattern and intensity of the reflections, and the rate at which different frequencies decay. Our brains derive information from these audio characteristics, enabling us to learn something about the nature of the space without necessarily seeing it. In music production, this means that the reverb type and its settings need to be chosen carefully if the human hearing system is to accept it as natural — or at least believable.

    In the early days of recording, there was no artificial reverb, so the effect was created by placing microphones and loudspeakers in a reflective room such as a tiled basement. Rockfield Studio in Wales even had a room made with suspended glass plates to create a variable reverberant environment. The different rooms built by different studios were often instrumental in how popular the studio turned out to be, but most of these rooms became obsolete when artificial reverb was invented. Probably the first successful artificial reverb device was the spring, though all kinds of weird and wonderful devices were created, including coiled pipes with a speaker at one end and a mic at the other.

    Analogue Reverb: Springs, Plates & Delays
    Apparently the first spring reverb was developed by accident after a couple of sound engineers experimented by dangling a coiled spring from a gramophone pickup cartridge, shaking it to create thunder effects for radio. By fitting a transducer to the other end of the spring, they found that sounds passed along the spring were picked up with a kind of reverb added, and so the spring reverb was born. Springs are still used in guitar amplifiers, and they have such a distinctive sound that modern digital reverb units often include spring emulations.

    While the spring worked well enough on vocals, guitars, and electronic organs, it wasn't so good on percussive sounds, as it had a tendency to 'twang' — the sound fluttered and pulsed as the reflections bounced back and forth along the length of the spring. You can get an idea of what spring reverb sounded like on vocals by trying one of those toy microphones with a spring and a diaphragm inside. (In fact some people have used these for recording in various ways!) All kinds of tricks were tried to improve the quality of spring reverb — immersing the spring in oil, using multiple springs with different characteristics, using heavy limiting on the input signal and extensive EQ — but it wasn't until the reverb plate was developed that artificial reverb really got serious.


    Before the reverb plate came on the scene, the most common artificial reverb option was based around steel springs, like these ones from Accutronics which can be found within some Fender guitar amps.
    Before the reverb plate came on the scene, the most common artificial reverb option was based around steel springs, like these ones from Accutronics which can be found within some Fender guitar amps.
    As its name suggests, the plate reverb utilised a thin metal plate, which could be as large as one metre square or more, suspended in a soundproof box and driven into vibration by means of a transducer similar to the voice-coil assembly of a loudspeaker. This arrangement was fed from a mixer aux send, via a suitable amplifier to drive the plate. Pickups mounted on the surface of the plate picked up the vibrations and fed them to a preamplifier, and the signal was then fed back to the mixer's aux returns. Normally two pickups, mounted at different positions on the plate's surface, were used to give a pseudo-stereo output from a mono input.

    The way the plate works is that sound energy from the input transducer moves very quickly from the transducer near the centre of the plate to the edges of the plate, where it bounces back. These reflections in turn encounter other plate edges and continue to re-reflect, losing energy but gaining complexity. Because the plate is rectangular and the sound waves propagate in a circular manner, even the first wave of reflections is very complex, as the expanding wavefront will encounter different parts of the edge of the plate at different times.

    The early part of real-life reverberation in larger spaces comprises a number of discrete reflections that are clearly audible before the dense reverb tail builds up. However, a reverb plate produces a very dense sound very quickly, and has no discernable early reflections. Because early reflections are fundamental in conveying a sense of room type to the listener, the plate is somewhat devoid of spatial character insomuch as it doesn't suggest any particular type of acoustic space, but in a musical context this can be an advantage, as we often use reverb as a musical effect, and not to create the illusion of a specific type of room or hall.



    Before digital delays became widespread, a common way of implementing delay was using tape loops. One of the most popular tape delays was the Roland RE201 Space Echo, which held a long tape loop in a bin just beneath its lid, as shown in the black and white picture below. The unit also included spring-based reverb which could be combined with the outputs of the machine's various tape heads. Tape delay remains popular, but is most likely to be encountered in digitally modelled form in plug-ins such as Universal Audio's new RE201 recreation (left).
    Before digital delays became widespread, a common way of implementing delay was using tape loops. One of the most popular tape delays was the Roland RE201 Space Echo, which held a long tape loop in a bin just beneath its lid, as shown in the black and white picture below. The unit also included spring-based reverb which could be combined with the outputs of the machine's various tape heads. Tape delay remains popular, but is most likely to be encountered in digitally modelled form in plug-ins such as Universal Audio's new RE201 recreation (left).
    While the plate has no real spatial character, it certainly has a recognisable tonal character and can tend to sound rather metallic, so EQ often needs to be used to improve the end result. The decay time of a plate is also fixed, unless some form of mechanical damping is applied, so the better plates were fitted with remote-control fabric pads that could be brought into contact with the plate to reduce the decay time. Undamped, the reverb time could be as long as five seconds or more, which is too long for most routine applications.

    Early spring or plate reverbs were also often used in conjunction with tape delay to help create a sense of space and size. As springs and plates generate no early reflections in the true sense of the word, adding one strong psychoacoustic cue using delay helps create a false sense of spatial identity. In a real room, this would equate to how long the sound takes to reach the first surface and then bounce back to the listener. The longer the pre-delay, the larger the space feels. Modern digital reverbs do the same by offering adjustable pre-delay times. For example, a typical vocal reverb treatment might comprise a plate reverb emulation with a decay time of 1.2 seconds or so and a pre-delay of 60-80ms.

    While plates are no longer commonplace, there are some extremely good digital simulations of the plate, such as the Universal Audio Plate 140 plug-in for the UAD1 card, and special algorithms need to be created to reproduce the rapid build-up of density that occurs in a real plate. These plate effects work particularly well on vocals, and would have been used on virtually all the classic records in the '60s and '70s. Multi-head-tape or magnetic-disc echo devices were also often used to create pseudo reverb, sometimes in conjunction with spring reverbs, but used alone these devices were unable to create the necessary density of repeats to emulate the real thing. Instead, the echo machine became an effect in its own right.

    The rest can be found here http://www.soundonsound.com/sos/mar06/articles/usingreverb.htm
     
    Last edited: Aug 28, 2009
  9. kama

    kama benkama.net

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    On effects, I mostly use bigger, very wet and rich reverbs.

    Vocals usually start with a little plate verb on them.

    Snares and a select few other percussion elements might get a short, maybe even gated reverb on them.
     
  10. dexter

    dexter Member

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    :gang_bang





    all interesting feedback, thanks for your time.