Resampling... Urgh.

Muta

Hologram
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#1
Yeah. Right, So i get the point to it, Changing a sounds by resampling it as fuck. (and making the sound more epic)

Still tho, how do you do it? i have read several threads on the net about it, but for some reason, i keep not understanding it...... Always when i try resampling. ( I make a bass in a synth, or some other sound, push some notes that sound good, wave it, Throw over fx, wave it, and repeat. ) it will sound like a total shit.

can anybody maybe help me out on this stuff? I just cant seem to do it for some reason.

btw, i work my shit in renoise, if that matters.

I really want to learn this stuff.
 
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#4
resampleing is alot of trail an error, you can get away with not resampleing and still coming out with the same result but you need a MEGA computer, resampleing saves CPU and basicly theres a lot of luck involed as well
you just need to spend alot of time trying things out! it takes time and effot but is well worth it:)
 

bite and gouge

Lee Fury & JtB
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#5
OK... stop. First you need to know your history, then you can apply the skill to the modern software.

Re-sampling was all about lack of raw power which is something even the novice has by the bucket these days. Historically, samplers have had a low amount of sampling time due to technology and price, so in order to make the most of what you had re-sampling was necessary. Very much like bouncing down stems on multi-trackers, it would free up space and resource for more processing. This over time changed, the power wasn't an issue... instead, you almost had too much. So re-sampling took on a different approach, now more so to simplify the process.

A classic drum and bass approach to re-sampled bass would be to spread out the same sound across a multi-channel output sampler, feed all channels into the desk and start adding FX/EQ to enhance the sound. Tweaking the envelopes of the different outputs to bring a certain characteristic through at a certain point in the sound. Maybe riding the distorted channel (because you're guaranteed to have one) live to make the sound move; a channel heavily compressed, another with the bottom eq'ed out and fed to a reverb unit, maybe tuning one up and one down etc... so many possibilities but I hope you get the concept. This would then be recorded and the best bits/sounds picked out for using in production, creating a multi sampled instrument or maybe further processing. Just bear in mind... playing the same sound duplicated will be loud, so start with all faders at zero and add as you go along to keep the volume under control.

There are so many techniques and ultimately, the hardware/software will shape your sound and over time evolve. It really is time to experiment when doing this and I would say it is better to think of it as sample design. Re-sampling is simply capturing what you have done.

Hope that helps a little?

Peace
 

Muta

Hologram
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#6
Thanks guys! Especially Bite! that is very useful. i think I'll just be fiddeling around with stuff more, till i finally get some sick shit then heh. Thanks for the history lesson, always is handy in understanding things, and where they came from and why hah. Thanks! :3 Ill post a result of what I can get with resampling a bass later on the day :]
 

bite and gouge

Lee Fury & JtB
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#7
Thanks guys! Especially Bite! that is very useful. i think I'll just be fiddeling around with stuff more, till i finally get some sick shit then heh. Thanks for the history lesson, always is handy in understanding things, and where they came from and why hah. Thanks! :3 Ill post a result of what I can get with resampling a bass later on the day :]
No problem at all bud.... will look forward to hearing the results.

Peace
 

luciduk

Active Member
VIP Junglist
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#10
OK... stop. First you need to know your history, then you can apply the skill to the modern software.

Re-sampling was all about lack of raw power which is something even the novice has by the bucket these days. Historically, samplers have had a low amount of sampling time due to technology and price, so in order to make the most of what you had re-sampling was necessary. Very much like bouncing down stems on multi-trackers, it would free up space and resource for more processing. This over time changed, the power wasn't an issue... instead, you almost had too much. So re-sampling took on a different approach, now more so to simplify the process.

A classic drum and bass approach to re-sampled bass would be to spread out the same sound across a multi-channel output sampler, feed all channels into the desk and start adding FX/EQ to enhance the sound. Tweaking the envelopes of the different outputs to bring a certain characteristic through at a certain point in the sound. Maybe riding the distorted channel (because you're guaranteed to have one) live to make the sound move; a channel heavily compressed, another with the bottom eq'ed out and fed to a reverb unit, maybe tuning one up and one down etc... so many possibilities but I hope you get the concept. This would then be recorded and the best bits/sounds picked out for using in production, creating a multi sampled instrument or maybe further processing. Just bear in mind... playing the same sound duplicated will be loud, so start with all faders at zero and add as you go along to keep the volume under control.

There are so many techniques and ultimately, the hardware/software will shape your sound and over time evolve. It really is time to experiment when doing this and I would say it is better to think of it as sample design. Re-sampling is simply capturing what you have done.

Hope that helps a little?

Peace
nice one mate

---------- Post added at 15:56 ---------- Previous post was at 15:55 ----------

and lol @ dj pancake
 

groelle

Well-Known Member
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#11
id usually bounce a whole channel when i run out of cpu. like i got a piano line thats more or less ready, export it, import and delete the old one. obviously save before you do that to make changes possible.

for bass, id usually export if i got the basic sound with a little bit processing so i dont ruin it by processing further ;)

hope that helps :)
 

subprime

Dysjoint
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#12
Resampling gives you more chance of a 'happy accident', especially changing start points of samples, looping, reversing, heavy fx/reverb/delay and zooming in on the tails when the note stops. The list goes on. I never really did it before the first production comp a while back, and again in this one.
It's quite cool dropping an audio sample in the daw, putting some fx or filters on that channel and then writing automations for them.

I also end up with a lot of unusable shit, but that's also true with a synth patch. Although you can keep refining a synth patch. I guess creating synths is like doing a painting and resampling is like taking snapshots on a camera.
 

Muta

Hologram
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#13
Alright, this is the result kinda:
http://www.mediafire.com/?fxt7uiq3x38fz9q

So I have been fiddling around with it a little bit, first made a reese (duh) in NI Massive. (thats the first bass sound you'll hear, the initial preset I made)

After that i went with some freq. splitting ( LP,BP,HP) and have fiddled around with automations and making things more funky with the help of CamelPhat. (then i rendered that bit to wav)

and after that ive started reversing, chopping, some extra reverb, till I got a few nice results, and this is kinda what I got.

(I suppose, with that final sound I got, i still could go on, rinse n repeat, see what I get, but i actually was pretty statisfied with this. )

let me know what you think :]
 

subprime

Dysjoint
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#14
Cool man. I'd say think on this: try some more detune, try more distortion/saturation/overdrive, try some chorus (stereo chorus that has slightly different settings on left adn right channels will widen the sound), and try running it through a limiter. Also phase/flange.


And also, don't rely on lfo synced to tempo to control your filters, try writing your own automations that play on and off the beat.
 

Muta

Hologram
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#15
Nice :3 Thanks, ill keep them in mind, tho i did fiddle with flanger haha.. maybe not enough, and a note about the LFO, is it possible doing that with renoise? as far as im conerned the most off-beat you ca get is with creating triplets... since its tracker, I have no idea haha.
 

subprime

Dysjoint
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#16
Nice :3 Thanks, ill keep them in mind, tho i did fiddle with flanger haha.. maybe not enough, and a note about the LFO, is it possible doing that with renoise? as far as im conerned the most off-beat you ca get is with creating triplets... since its tracker, I have no idea haha.
Sorry man, no idea about renoise. I was talking about switching lfo off altogether and assigning an automation curve to cutoff then writing that.

yeah flange and phase (to me) always sound like an 'effect' where-as chorus and reverb and distortion can really just enhance the sound.
 

Muta

Hologram
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#17
Sorry man, no idea about renoise. I was talking about switching lfo off altogether and assigning an automation curve to cutoff then writing that.

yeah flange and phase (to me) always sound like an 'effect' where-as chorus and reverb and distortion can really just enhance the sound.
haha, I tihnk I can figure out the Lfo things ;3

exactly, I know what ya mean, Sometime I also like to just, leave them out... can get annoyed with em alot, as for chorus.. it kind of depends how you apply it to the sund youre chaning up. Sometimes it also does sound like' an effect ' instead of enchancing the whole thing.

great tips tho!! Deff will keep em in the back of my head when giving this another attempt ;3
 
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