reese bass....

Discussion in 'Production' started by DESyFER, Dec 6, 2004.

  1. DESyFER

    DESyFER New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 10, 2003
    Messages:
    7
    Likes Received:
    0
    Any tips for creating heavy reese basslines??
     
  2. kama

    kama benkama.net

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2002
    Messages:
    2,768
    Likes Received:
    48
    Location:
    Halfway between the gutter and stars
    start with 2 or more saw waveforms, phase them out a bit from each other, add reverb a bit to one layer, flanger to another, filters with LFO's, 1 sine wave to add bottom sub without any major effects. Shake well and mix together,,,,,,, voilá!!

    Basically, the saw wave multiplied and phased out is the backbone. there you can only add some. use your imagination.
     
    Dustek likes this.
  3. kama

    kama benkama.net

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2002
    Messages:
    2,768
    Likes Received:
    48
    Location:
    Halfway between the gutter and stars
    the line itself is a completely another matter then if that's what you were getting at..... as you propably were. damn.
     
  4. Andydextruss

    Andydextruss Something

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2004
    Messages:
    212
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Norwich, England
    To make a reese in its original form ie, to imitate the 1st ever reese, you get 2 sawtooth waves, detune 1 to -50cent, put them out of phase, apply a low pass filter so its really deep and rumbling, then add distorion and unison. Unison is what really does it, and you only want a tiiny bit of distortion.

    Reeses in its current definition are usually resampled and given loads of distortion, reverb, flangers, etc. Its the combination of effects that make it individual.

    As for notes they are usually 1 constant note in the piano roll editor but with the synths octave and semitone controls automated so it changes notes but is 1 continuous noise.

    I tend to go for simple up/down scales for 2-3 bars then 1-2 bars of a single note. Using more automated distortion on the longer notes to make it "move". Or try copying your melody then simplifying it, so the melody has more notes and the reese has longer 1s but they will sound good together.
     
  5. checkmabadself

    checkmabadself A gift from punjab

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2003
    Messages:
    344
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Portsmouth
    Thats the problem I have I can get the Bass to the sound I want but its the laying down I have difficulty with.

    Any help with this would be much appreiciated

    :grouphug:
     
  6. Vaimler

    Vaimler persevering

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2004
    Messages:
    20
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    a long way from home
    Maybe you could try this approach for the laying down..
    If you have a sound you like but don't like the original attack or only like the inter-twine of waves
    a few oscillations further, record a long sample of the synth with all the fluxuations and variations
    (to create a line, do the same for other pitches allso)
    and import/cut it up in your sequencer, this way you can isolate the pieces your after, and have complete control over tones,lengths,.. (does create phase-issues though)
    The rest is a matter of fading /adding attack/compress and layering to create the line itself
    Hope it helped