Reece layered sine question

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#1
Sup guys,
When making a reece, im wondering if it is worth layering a sub bass sine wave under it or not. Does doing this actually create a more solid low end or is it not worth bothering?
I've made plently of nice reece patches which I feel have a decent sub but just I wanted to know what everyone thinks about this.
 

xiris

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#2
I'd say, typically, yes it is worth it [there are always exceptions]. It does create a more solid low end, because the straight sine wave will not have any phasing issues created by the nature of a reece bass. low cut your reece, high cut your sub, both somewhere around 100Hz [depends on the key of the song] and away you go.
 

Solace

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#3
All depends of what you want.

If you want a solid sub, not moving around, add a sine.
But, if you a more moving sub works with the tune (and the reese has enough sub), leave it in.

Simple as that
 
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#4
bare in mind you can get the sub to move underneath too, for instance you can add two sines and detune them slightly from eachother. keeps the fatness of the sub and still has movement
 
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#5
or if the reese sample some low frequencies that you like you can split the signal into two bands and process the sub frequencies seperately and compress them etc to make the low end fatter in the reese whilst keeping the original movement exactly as it is
 

Mania

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#6
All depends of what you want.

If you want a solid sub, not moving around, add a sine.
But, if you a more moving sub works with the tune (and the reese has enough sub), leave it in.

Simple as that
It really is. The reason chucking a sine underneath became a thing was because reese subs can rollercoaster up and down, which can sound shitty. But if your reese isn't doing that and it sounds nice, then there's no point.
 

lug00ber

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#7
I'd say, typically, yes it is worth it [there are always exceptions]. It does create a more solid low end, because the straight sine wave will not have any phasing issues created by the nature of a reece bass. low cut your reece, high cut your sub, both somewhere around 100Hz [depends on the key of the song] and away you go.
There's really no need to filter a sine wave :)
 

smoothassilk

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#9
I think you should filter out the highs of the sub.. you can get unwanted clicks come through from when the sub changes note, just as like a failsafe, unless you have some desirable character on top of your sub.. keep that in!
You'll never get this if you learn to set your attack and release right i.e. not quite at zero
 
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#10
it does help, but sometimes higher frequencies can still creep through for various other reasons, just acts as a failsafe without taking any clarity from the sub
 

Mania

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#11
it does help, but sometimes higher frequencies can still creep through for various other reasons, just acts as a failsafe without taking any clarity from the sub
And is something you do when you want to add harmonics to the sub, but stop it from creeping too high in the spectrum
 

JAGZ

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#12
If you design the Reece in FM8 you can send the sine/sub operators to the output without it being effected by the modulating saw waves.

Adding a sine to already designed patches works similarly. But as mentioned above, some level of movement to the sub would be ideal, s/C kick signal is an option with that or random volume automation, whatever sounds good to you.
 
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