Radio killed the drum and bass star!! ;)

Discussion in 'Production' started by thin king, Feb 20, 2009.

  1. thin king

    thin king Member

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    Well not really........Had a tune of mine played on the radio last night - BBC radio sheffield, and it sounded bloody awful.....I have no clue why as the tune was finished to be hitting on 0db and when played out sounds fine, but when broadcast the volume was all over the place in the quiet bits it increased and on the drops majorly decreased, is the compressors they use just set to a crazy threshold??? are you meant to finish tunes so they have loads of headroom just incase??? I am so gutted cos I was looking forward to this for a while - anyone got any reasons as to why or any tips on how to avoid the same happening in the future if I ever get the chance again?? :confused:
     
  2. kama

    kama benkama.net

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    Radio shows always maximise their output sound with a harsh compressor, because the stronger the signal, the farther it will carry. If you have light signals in between, the signal will degrade with longer distances. Not 100% sure about this but I think this is the reason for that harsh compression.

    If you have an already maximum compressed sound, a radio compressor will make the effect even worse. This is really prominent in radio shows that play lots of different kinds of music but then blast on a few dnb tracks which are usually already very much compressed.

    Did you do home mastering on the track, ie. limit or compress the master channel?
     
  3. thin king

    thin king Member

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    no thats just the thing I made sure I didn't do anything like that for the exact reason of it being played on the radio as I knew about the compression issue but just didn't think it would be quite so harsh - maybe headroom as if sending for a master is the key?? not trying to go for 0db or maximum volume with no clips!!
     
  4. *State

    *State Self confessed VW nut

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    I recon compression on the master fader should be left to the mastering house to sort out properly. If i was going to have a track playing out on the radio i wouldnt use any compression on the master...just some EQ and limiting on the bass to make sure it stays consistant with no duff notes. Also sending the track off to be mastered giving at least -6db/8db headroom for them to work with, they make it loud for you.

    Any chance i could hear the tune bud?
     
  5. thin king

    thin king Member

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  6. H*product

    H*product Heavyweight product

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    the reason the radio limit/compress things: say your driving your car (or in any noisy enviroment, a site etc) and theres a noise floor of say 70db. the radio your listenin to it on can produce 90db. if a track on the radio has any dynamic range it may slip out of this 20db range. so they basically brickwall limit everything to keep it clearly audible.

    if you are having tunes played on the radio i'd say its prob best to limit(and master) yourself. do them quite hard to remove the dynamics yourself as you'll do a better job than there 'one size fits all' approach. if your tune doesn't have the drops in dynamic range their limiter wont be effecting your signal as much.

    hope this helps.
     
  7. Alexi

    Alexi Drench Audio

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    I'm not an expert, but my mates brother used to work in a radio station, and like other people have said they use really harsh compressors.

    You know when the DJ talks over a record and they're voice cuts through and the track lays down, that's the compression at work, they also use really tight noise gates, so if not proffesionally mastered, the quiet parts of the track may trigger the gate.

    Or possibly dodgy equipment like a loose cable making the signal go all over the place.