Piano sounds/piano vst

miszt

BASSFACE Royale
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#5
Ableton's Grand Piano on the EIC dvd's are very nice, but i prefer to use my yamaha P155 for acustic piano sounds, its just ((<3)), cant beat the resonance and cross-string harmonics of a properly designed piano synth!
 

ali^

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#6
You can make most inbuilt pianos sound pretty decent if you just take the time to make it sound right. I usually detune it a tiny bit, mess with resonances and decays, and hit each note of a chord at very very slightly different times to make it sound a bit more realistic.

This was a "Walton Piano Refill" which was just pretty much a pre made piano combinator in reason, but if you don't tweek them they always sound a little stale so just try and make each hit a bit unique, tiny bitch bends etc.
https://soundcloud.com/http%3A%2F%2Fsoundcloud.com%2Fsoek%2Fsnooze-ya-lose
 

Wrigzilla

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#8
I use some free multisample yamaha c7 pack I downloaded like a year ago (can't remember from where)/samples from classical songs. Even if you know what you're doing in programing a more realistic performance from piano samples it's well hard to get quite the same vibe as a real pianist tinkling the ivories.
 

ARTFX

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#9
Synthogy Ivory Grand Piano, best one I've found so far. Great realistic sound.
Also NI Akoustik is a great one!

But with only a great sounding plugin you're not there yet, you need to do a lot of playing, recording, tweaking and much more to get a piano sounding realistic.
For me plugins like the FL Keys and other simple (free) piano plugins just don't sound right. They don't have the realistic sound and warmth of a real grand piano, even when using lots of effects like reverb and EQ, so I prefer using Ivory Grand or Akoustik and building on from that.

The best way to get realistic piano sounds out of your DAW is learning how to play a keyboard and play it in by yourself.
Much more lively and realistic in timing.
 

groelle

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#10
The best way to get realistic piano sounds out of your DAW is learning how to play a keyboard and play it in by yourself.
Much more lively and realistic in timing.
bullshiiiiit. we play everythin in by ourselfes and although were not the crumpiest players on earth, not a single time we didnt put the notes to the grid, electronic music just doenst work like that. quantizing = unnecessary.

as for vsts, just search the net, im not with artfx on that aswell, you just have to know what youre doing. ie put 2 reverbs on a piano, one with a very short decay, no damping and small room, one almost the opposite. the first one is the reverb that you hear coming from the piano itself, the second one is the room the keys are beeing played in - if you do that with some clever eqing and settings, almost every vst can be used.
 
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Wrigzilla

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#11
bullshiiiiit. we play everythin in by ourselfes and although were not the crumpiest players on earth, not a single time we didnt put the notes to the grid, electronic music just doenst work like that. quantizing = unnecessary.
Unless I'm horribly mistaken you're both saying the same thing. Artfx is saying that the best way to get realistic piano performances from samplers is to play in the notes yourself. Then you say you play the notes in yourself.

As far as I'm concerned the SINGLE most realistic way to get realistic piano is to record a pianist playing. The next best way is to play in notes yourself using a good multisampled piano pack. Depending on how you do it sampling classical cds can be good too.
 

ARTFX

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#13
no im basically saying we put them to the grid afterwards, meaning you don't really have to play them in.
Well maybe you do that, but when I'm talking about piano lines I'm not quantizing anything except for the main chords, I think that the little differences in timing give it a slightly more realistic feel than when it's quantized.
That with some good use of reverb, melody and chord use and EQ and you are on the right way.
 

Freek

Lets get freeeeeeky
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#14
Well maybe you do that, but when I'm talking about piano lines I'm not quantizing anything except for the main chords, I think that the little differences in timing give it a slightly more realistic feel than when it's quantized.
That with some good use of reverb, melody and chord use and EQ and you are on the right way.
I agree with both tbh, i normally play all my piano parts in and depending on the quality of it, i might decide to then sequence it in if it sounds off. just depends on what you're going for tbh, oh and synthology ivory grand for the win. however i have for many years used the "A Grand Piano" NNXT preset in Reason and it does the job nicely with the right velocity on each note aswell as a lot of processing in cubase.
 
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#15
propellerhead reason pianos. 24bit Hypersamples of the world's most famous pianos (yamaha, steinberg, bosendorfer.) Can't go wrong.

and playing it live DOES help massively. Natural Velocity is stupidly important to getting a piano to sound good, as well as using a great reverb and not just slapping a plate/altiverb or something on it and hoping for the best.
 
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