Piano in Liquid Drum & Bass

Messages
105
Likes
3
#2
TruePiano is quite good, but ultimately any of those plugins you mention above will give you a decent enough piano sound to start with. It's then about processing it properly (reverb, delay, eq, etc.) and ultimately its what works in the context of the track. In terms of that Smote track, what is particularly good about the piano part is the use of dynamics (i.e. not all the notes are at the same volume - it sounds very 'natural') which gives it that rolling feel.
 

ApeCat

Human Dubplate
VIP Junglist
Messages
2,931
Likes
134
#4
FL Keys

Fruity Reverb 2 - small room size, low "damp" setting, probs turn down the decay a bit
Fruity Reverb 2 - large room size, high "damp" setting, defo turn the decay down a bit
EQ - cut out most of the bottoms and a bit of the tops

Safe.
 

lostnthesound

Burns Easily in the Sun
VIP Junglist
Messages
1,392
Likes
191
#7
If it's the piano timbre you're looking for, I rely on Kontakt's piano kits. They're not short of astounding and offer instant satisfaction. If you're using Logic, the EXS24 has several lovely sampled pianos. The key is to add character to them via plugins. I find that a high res bitcrusher setting, a touch of overdrive and some ambient reverb can really create a lovely paino sound the cuts through the mix properly.

If it's chords you're looking for, do a bit of searching to find some songs you like and try to discover what keys they are written in. I know beatport has Key labels for all the tracks (though I question the accuracy of some). Anyways, find out what key you're looking to write your tune in and then learn the appropriate chords to coincide with your key. Then just start jamming out while recording.

Cheers.
 
Top