Philosophy of Music

Discussion in 'Waffle' started by Rusket, May 12, 2013.

  1. Rusket

    Rusket Mix an blend

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    Premise: Human capabilities are the result of evolution, and either were useful in times of evolutionary adaption or are still useful today.

    So...

    Why have humans evolved to be able to interpret, analyse and appreciate music?
    Did music serve an evolutionary purpose?
    What is the connection between music and emotions?
    Can monkeys appreciate music (hopefully they can)?
     
  2. Hombre-J

    Hombre-J Currently Ballsacked

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    Humans accidentally music at a cave
     
  3. Dugg Funnie

    Dugg Funnie Well-Known Member

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    /\ This.

    Why have humans evolved to be able to interpret, analyse and appreciate music?
    - We invented it. It works the same way as language, albeit more esoteric, it's a series of arranged symbols used to convey or portray real-world events to be interpreted by a third party.


    Did music serve an evolutionary purpose?
    - In a strictly hereditary sense? No. And in regards to social evolution I think it's more of a reaction to change rather than the agent of change itself. So....sort of?

    What is the connection between music and emotions?
    - Complicated. The sequence of melody, harmony, and rhythm contained in a musical event create a physical reaction in our body (obviously this reaction dramatically varies from person to person) which also can trigger emotions; many times the specific emotion will be linked to a time you heard the song before (or perhaps the same drum beat, or chord progression) and whatever was going on in the world infront of you as you listened.

    This explains why one person can listen to a song 100 times on repeat and still love it while another hears half the tune and turns it off. So, because of the similarity of most music; western scales, modes, rhythm structure every time you hear a new song you're more experiencing a new combination of different sonic-triggered emotions you've already experienced. If it makes you the right kind of happy, you'll love the tune; if it doesn't, you won't. ;)


    /smart rant
     
  4. Rusket

    Rusket Mix an blend

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    The general consensus among evolutionary biologists is that language evolved in order to aid survival in the same way that our vision, hearing, etc did. The premise of this discussion was that the capabilities of humans (i.e. able to appreciate music) are the result of millions of years of evolution. Still doesn't explain the prevalence of music in the world today.

    Interesting thoughts, could you explain what you mean by reaction to change rather than the agent itself?

    Yeah that's definitely true about music triggering a memory of when you heard it before, I suspect that the music triggers the same neurones that fire along a particular neural path. Wow, the science of music is fascinating.
     
  5. logikz

    logikz I Am Not The King Staff Member

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    i have my wang out. i showd it to hero on skype earlier

    - - - Updated - - -

    oh and this song
     
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  6. Dugg Funnie

    Dugg Funnie Well-Known Member

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    Well I think to get more accurate with what I said; music usually isn't the first thing that happens that beings about shifts in culture. It's majesty is displayed in how far it can spread, and, given the right chords and words, change and influence generations leaving only the catchy reminders of what the times once were.

    Post WWII/Korea and all that, along with Yellow Fever and the Red Scare people were frustrated and boxed in and almost paranoid and scared of everyone being a communist or a spy they were tired of that shizz and wanted different freedoms 'n' that. So, they wrote songs about it (reaction to change) which spread like wildfire inevitably becoming a representative of majority opinion (transformation from cultural reaction to agent of influence). And so history bears repeating.
     
  7. Shatner's Bosom

    Shatner's Bosom murder TANMUSHIMUSHI

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  8. Catsel

    Catsel Well-Known Dismember

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