Octane & DLR Sample Pack

lostnthesound

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#2
I bought it and honestly, it's one of the finest sample packs I've purchased. In terms of quality and usability, it's right up there with Danny Byrd's sample pack. Lots of quality hits, lots of loops that can be dissected to your heart's content, and a nice array of sample patches to mess with. They cram a lot of stuff into this pack. Even the bass/music loops can be chopped up nicely. If you're using Logic, go for the Apple Loops pack as the files will adjust to your projects key/tempo automatically.
 

Rubs90

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#3
I bought it and honestly, it's one of the finest sample packs I've purchased. In terms of quality and usability, it's right up there with Danny Byrd's sample pack. Lots of quality hits, lots of loops that can be dissected to your heart's content, and a nice array of sample patches to mess with. They cram a lot of stuff into this pack. Even the bass/music loops can be chopped up nicely. If you're using Logic, go for the Apple Loops pack as the files will adjust to your projects key/tempo automatically.
Couldn't have asked for a better answer! Thanks
 
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#4
Sample packs can be good but there ones that just top all, i personally haven't checked the Octane out yet, sounds like has some nice stabs in it.
 

lostnthesound

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#5
Couldn't have asked for a better answer! Thanks
Glad I could help Rubs90. And I would strongly recommend the Danny Byrd pack as well. The selling point on that pack is that he has all of his drum loops broken down into individual kits with hits, with all the respective hits tuned properly. But I digress. Enjoy the Octane pack. Big fat sounds.
 

Rubs90

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#7
Just bought this, very sexy indeed! Loving the drum samples, but not sure as to how I far I can use the bass samples. I know I'm just making tunes for practice, but I dont like the feeling of just modulating a patch that came from a sample pack. How far do you guys usually take sample packs? When you first look at them, what do you know your gonna use and what your not gonna use? Bear in mind I dont plan on sending these tunes to label, just learning the steps here :)
 

lostnthesound

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#8
Just bought this, very sexy indeed! Loving the drum samples, but not sure as to how I far I can use the bass samples. I know I'm just making tunes for practice, but I dont like the feeling of just modulating a patch that came from a sample pack. How far do you guys usually take sample packs? When you first look at them, what do you know your gonna use and what your not gonna use? Bear in mind I dont plan on sending these tunes to label, just learning the steps here :)
Honestly, it's entirely up to you. If a loop or patch fits your track, just say "fuck it" and go for it. And IMO, there's nothing wrong with you using a sample or patch if it fits properly, and why wouldn't you send it to a label? The sample you purchased is cleared and if it makes your tune bang, I don't see the problem. Also, even if you start a track with a sample and build it around that sample, there's no reason you can't simply take it out later if your tune stands its ground on its on.

I can see how people may perceive the use of samples and loops as "cheating," but I call bullshit on that for two reasons: The first is that even if you have a track laid out with all purchased samples and what not, it's still going to take some skill -- skill to EQ all those sounds, skill to get them to fit together nicely, and most of all skill to make sure the arrangement is banging. The second reason is a bit of a metaphor: Producers are like chefs in that just because you have all the ingredients (i.e. purchased samples) in front of you doesn't mean you'll automatically be able to create a 5 star meal (i.e. #1 dancefloor killer). What good are those ingredients if you don't know how to use them to their full potential and/or make them taste good for that matter?

Personally, I dabble in both original loops/beats and sample-purchased. If I've purchased them, I usually chop them up, rearrange them, run them through a filter etc. just to add my own bit of flavor...except with drums. I may start with a break loop sample as a reference but then I build the kits from the ground up. Later on I'll take some break loops and EQ the hell out of them just to add them to my drums to add some drive to the kit. I'm all about total control and usually I'll strip the samples as much as possible so I have maximum flexibility with them. Hell, sometimes I'll even throw them in the old EXS24 and see what happens with a bit of modulation crazyness.

In closing (and to end this long winded post of mine) here are some examples of big producers who have used samples from packs. Tantrum Desire's song "Reach" uses the "Reach Up" vocal from the Zero-G Vocal Forge sample pack. Drumsound & Bassline Smith's "Freak" uses a couple FX loops from a Wave Alchemy FX pack...and I know this because I own both and was enlightened when I heard them in my DAW audio preview area. And then there are Vengeance packs...just skimming through the loops (found usually in the "special sounds folder") in the packs will cause you to take a second listen to some of the sounds and realize "Holy shit, I've heard this sample on so and so's track!" You'd be surprised how many you'd come across, especially in Vengeance Essential House Vol. 2.

Of course this is all in my humble opinion.

Cheers!
 
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#9
Honestly, it's entirely up to you. If a loop or patch fits your track, just say "fuck it" and go for it. And IMO, there's nothing wrong with you using a sample or patch if it fits properly, and why wouldn't you send it to a label? The sample you purchased is cleared and if it makes your tune bang, I don't see the problem. Also, even if you start a track with a sample and build it around that sample, there's no reason you can't simply take it out later if your tune stands its ground on its on.

I can see how people may perceive the use of samples and loops as "cheating," but I call bullshit on that for two reasons: The first is that even if you have a track laid out with all purchased samples and what not, it's still going to take some skill -- skill to EQ all those sounds, skill to get them to fit together nicely, and most of all skill to make sure the arrangement is banging. The second reason is a bit of a metaphor: Producers are essentially chefs, and just because you have all the ingredients in front of you doesn't mean you'll automatically be able to create a 5 star meal. What good are those ingredients if you don't know how to use them to their full potential and/or make them taste good for that matter?

Personally, I dabble in both original loops/beats and sample-purchased. If I've purchased them, I usually chop them up, rearrange them, run them through a filter etc. just to add my own bit of flavor...except with drums. I may start with a break loop sample as a reference but then I build the kits from the ground up. Later on I'll take some break loops and EQ the hell out of them just to add them to my drums to add some drive to the kit. I'm all about total control and usually I'll strip the samples as much as possible so I have maximum flexibility with them. Hell, sometimes I'll even throw them in the old EXS24 and see what happens with a bit of modulation crazyness.

In closing (and to end this long winded post of mine) here are some examples of big producers who have used samples from packs. Tantrum Desire's song "Reach" uses the "Reach Up" vocal from the Zero-G Vocal Forge sample pack. Drumsound & Bassline Smith's "Freak" uses a couple FX loops from a Wave Alchemy FX pack...and I know this because I own both and was enlightened when I heard them in my DAW audio preview area. And then there are Vengeance packs...just skimming through the loops (found usually in the "special sounds folder") in the packs will cause you to take a second listen to some of the sounds and realize "Holy shit, I've heard this sample on so and so's track!" You'd be surprised how many you'd come across, especially in Vengeance Essential House Vol. 2.

Of course this is all in my humble opinion.

Cheers!
Nice post mate
 

lostnthesound

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#10
lul wut?

I get your point :) but why use Tesco's pre-cooked vegetables when you can pull some straight out the garden fresh, no wutimsayin?

nah i like your post really! just joking around.. Like you say, if you can modulate a sample past recognition then you get brownie points for originality anyway and nobody will call you out
LoL, yeah mate, I should perhaps reword that line slightly :)

Cheers.
 

Rubs90

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#11
Honestly, it's entirely up to you. If a loop or patch fits your track, just say "fuck it" and go for it. And IMO, there's nothing wrong with you using a sample or patch if it fits properly, and why wouldn't you send it to a label? The sample you purchased is cleared and if it makes your tune bang, I don't see the problem. Also, even if you start a track with a sample and build it around that sample, there's no reason you can't simply take it out later if your tune stands its ground on its on.

I can see how people may perceive the use of samples and loops as "cheating," but I call bullshit on that for two reasons: The first is that even if you have a track laid out with all purchased samples and what not, it's still going to take some skill -- skill to EQ all those sounds, skill to get them to fit together nicely, and most of all skill to make sure the arrangement is banging. The second reason is a bit of a metaphor: Producers are like chefs in that just because you have all the ingredients (i.e. purchased samples) in front of you doesn't mean you'll automatically be able to create a 5 star meal (i.e. #1 dancefloor killer). What good are those ingredients if you don't know how to use them to their full potential and/or make them taste good for that matter?

Personally, I dabble in both original loops/beats and sample-purchased. If I've purchased them, I usually chop them up, rearrange them, run them through a filter etc. just to add my own bit of flavor...except with drums. I may start with a break loop sample as a reference but then I build the kits from the ground up. Later on I'll take some break loops and EQ the hell out of them just to add them to my drums to add some drive to the kit. I'm all about total control and usually I'll strip the samples as much as possible so I have maximum flexibility with them. Hell, sometimes I'll even throw them in the old EXS24 and see what happens with a bit of modulation crazyness.

In closing (and to end this long winded post of mine) here are some examples of big producers who have used samples from packs. Tantrum Desire's song "Reach" uses the "Reach Up" vocal from the Zero-G Vocal Forge sample pack. Drumsound & Bassline Smith's "Freak" uses a couple FX loops from a Wave Alchemy FX pack...and I know this because I own both and was enlightened when I heard them in my DAW audio preview area. And then there are Vengeance packs...just skimming through the loops (found usually in the "special sounds folder") in the packs will cause you to take a second listen to some of the sounds and realize "Holy shit, I've heard this sample on so and so's track!" You'd be surprised how many you'd come across, especially in Vengeance Essential House Vol. 2.

Of course this is all in my humble opinion.

Cheers!
Interesting read for sure! And I know a lot of big producers who were delighted with this sample pack - surely they're not just listening to it. I asked that question because although I'm getting along nicely with the drums I'm having some troubles making nice bass patches, and I was watching the Alix Perez tutorial video and he said when he began producing he would use bass from sample packs. Might have a go at modulating these bass patches, and even if it doesn't work, it's still good practice. Cheers!
 

Skuff

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#12
Quality post :beers:

Honestly, it's entirely up to you. If a loop or patch fits your track, just say "fuck it" and go for it. And IMO, there's nothing wrong with you using a sample or patch if it fits properly, and why wouldn't you send it to a label? The sample you purchased is cleared and if it makes your tune bang, I don't see the problem. Also, even if you start a track with a sample and build it around that sample, there's no reason you can't simply take it out later if your tune stands its ground on its on.

I can see how people may perceive the use of samples and loops as "cheating," but I call bullshit on that for two reasons: The first is that even if you have a track laid out with all purchased samples and what not, it's still going to take some skill -- skill to EQ all those sounds, skill to get them to fit together nicely, and most of all skill to make sure the arrangement is banging. The second reason is a bit of a metaphor: Producers are like chefs in that just because you have all the ingredients (i.e. purchased samples) in front of you doesn't mean you'll automatically be able to create a 5 star meal (i.e. #1 dancefloor killer). What good are those ingredients if you don't know how to use them to their full potential and/or make them taste good for that matter?

Personally, I dabble in both original loops/beats and sample-purchased. If I've purchased them, I usually chop them up, rearrange them, run them through a filter etc. just to add my own bit of flavor...except with drums. I may start with a break loop sample as a reference but then I build the kits from the ground up. Later on I'll take some break loops and EQ the hell out of them just to add them to my drums to add some drive to the kit. I'm all about total control and usually I'll strip the samples as much as possible so I have maximum flexibility with them. Hell, sometimes I'll even throw them in the old EXS24 and see what happens with a bit of modulation crazyness.

In closing (and to end this long winded post of mine) here are some examples of big producers who have used samples from packs. Tantrum Desire's song "Reach" uses the "Reach Up" vocal from the Zero-G Vocal Forge sample pack. Drumsound & Bassline Smith's "Freak" uses a couple FX loops from a Wave Alchemy FX pack...and I know this because I own both and was enlightened when I heard them in my DAW audio preview area. And then there are Vengeance packs...just skimming through the loops (found usually in the "special sounds folder") in the packs will cause you to take a second listen to some of the sounds and realize "Holy shit, I've heard this sample on so and so's track!" You'd be surprised how many you'd come across, especially in Vengeance Essential House Vol. 2.

Of course this is all in my humble opinion.

Cheers!
 

xiu

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#13
Quality pack for deep / deep techstep drum and bass.
Quality hits, quality loops , I would give it a 9,99 / 10 :)
Depends on what type of dnb you want to focus on , but with a little eq help / distortion / layering you can get anything out of these samples.
Also for those who are searching for other top techstep / neurofunk , call it whatever patches , I can recommend Industrial Strenght Rough Drum and Bass Connections series, specially 4th edition i think. Can't check now but I think that is the one.
With some layering / eq from some top quality samples you can get almost anything.

Have fun with the samples and be creative !

Cheers !
 
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