New track working in progress help?

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#1
I've managed to make changes to the mixing (on my original track bass trap) so that all of the tracks no longer clip apart from the vocals which unless clip can't be heard on the track so I just let them clip (only clip on there individual channel strip) as I don't see how else to leave them in? The output track doesn't clip at all and I have linked to the track if you would have a listen. I have tried A-B ing by comparing the volume to a dnb track or two and I think the overall track volume is a lot more similar now, however I'm unsure of how to get certain parts of the track to stand out such as the last drop 2.25 onwards I think the drums need to be louder but I'm not sure whether I should do this at the expense of making other parts of the track quieter? In preventing the clipping the majority of the compression on tracks is now turned off, think theres just a bit on the vocals. Can compression still be used to get parts to stand out without clipping somehow? If you could let me know all feedback would be really appreciated cheers.

heres the working progress track.
https://soundcloud.com/cross-0ver%2Fbass-trap-remix
 

DYSRUPT

Active Member
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#2
The whole track will get louder with a proper mixdown. It sounds very foggy and spread out like crazy.
I dont think compression is what you need to worry about here. youll get more perceived volume from a good mixdown without forcing it and you may need a compressor to tame certain tracks because once everything has breathing room,some sounds might be too much.

-Mid side every track and cut out the lows from the sides.
-make sure you do NOT use a standard hz to cut to. What will happen is, lets say you cut the lows from the sides of every track but the sub, kick and sanre to 200hz. youll get a buildup of resonance at 200hz creating muddy area.
-Low cut the mid of every track that doesnt need sub information. again, do this surgically and decide what needs a little more low end and what doesnt. (i usually keep some of the snare low at 100hz ONLY if the track needs it)
and that goes for every track
-MONO the vocals, drums and sub.
-spread the vocals slightly if needed
-As a last resort, sidechain the synths to the vocals VERY SUBTLE it might just give the vocals what they need to stand forward, but DONT do this so its obvious.
-sidechain the sub and synth to snare to let the snare breathe. (do this in moderation. Less on the sub, more on the synths)
-sidechain the sub to the kick to let the kick breathe (do this in moderation so the sub isnt clicky and lost)
-The kick and snare are lost here. Bring the volume DOWN on all tracks and build them AROUND the kick and snare.
-If you'll notice the high synths around 2:40 come in loud and DONT compete with anything in the frequency spectrum. thats why they stand out so much. It almost sounds like they were added AFTER the whole track was glued together with too much compression, leaving them untouched and not glued to the track. either way, those sounds are a perfect example of what you want to achieve with all the sounds.

Another bit of advice. When you A/B to pro tracks, know what you are looking for. dont just check how LOUD it is, Check the mid side too. Solo the sides and see whats NOT there and how loud they are soloed Also check to see where the sides have been low cut and shelved.

Ill link a video of analyzing pro stuff and to know what to look for.
 
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#6
The whole track will get louder with a proper mixdown. It sounds very foggy and spread out like crazy.
I dont think compression is what you need to worry about here. youll get more perceived volume from a good mixdown without forcing it and you may need a compressor to tame certain tracks because once everything has breathing room,some sounds might be too much.

-Mid side every track and cut out the lows from the sides.
-make sure you do NOT use a standard hz to cut to. What will happen is, lets say you cut the lows from the sides of every track but the sub, kick and sanre to 200hz. youll get a buildup of resonance at 200hz creating muddy area.
-Low cut the mid of every track that doesnt need sub information. again, do this surgically and decide what needs a little more low end and what doesnt. (i usually keep some of the snare low at 100hz ONLY if the track needs it)
and that goes for every track
-MONO the vocals, drums and sub.
-spread the vocals slightly if needed
-As a last resort, sidechain the synths to the vocals VERY SUBTLE it might just give the vocals what they need to stand forward, but DONT do this so its obvious.
-sidechain the sub and synth to snare to let the snare breathe. (do this in moderation. Less on the sub, more on the synths)
-sidechain the sub to the kick to let the kick breathe (do this in moderation so the sub isnt clicky and lost)
-The kick and snare are lost here. Bring the volume DOWN on all tracks and build them AROUND the kick and snare.
-If you'll notice the high synths around 2:40 come in loud and DONT compete with anything in the frequency spectrum. thats why they stand out so much. It almost sounds like they were added AFTER the whole track was glued together with too much compression, leaving them untouched and not glued to the track. either way, those sounds are a perfect example of what you want to achieve with all the sounds.

Another bit of advice. When you A/B to pro tracks, know what you are looking for. dont just check how LOUD it is, Check the mid side too. Solo the sides and see whats NOT there and how loud they are soloed Also check to see where the sides have been low cut and shelved.

Ill link a video of analyzing pro stuff and to know what to look for.
Very useful advice, but what do you mean by a "standard hz"?
 
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#7
I think what he meant by that is you should not high pass every sample/synth on the same frequency (for instance 200hz) as a standard. For instance, snare cut snare at 100hz, hats at 250 hz, synth at 200 hz etc.etc. or else "youll get a buildup of resonance at 200hz creating muddy area.".

Dit I get that right @DYSRUPT ?
 

DYSRUPT

Active Member
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#8
Yes. I used to high pass all my tracks to keep the sub freq. from clashing, But I cut to 200 and was left with a resonant bump at 200, killing the beef of the snare. I had no clue why my snares werent beefy until someone pointed that out. So now I cut whats needed and low shelf some, not as much as I would in the past. If you cut too much you end up with a tinny weak track.
 
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