Need help, sub bass range too vast.

JocklawUS

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#1
Hey all,

I'm working on a remix right now, and using an orchestra track from the original song, I've created a sub bassline to follow it. However, the gap between the highest and the lowest note is too big. For example, the lowest note is D and the highest is A. The problem is, I think the D is too low for the average speaker to be able to play (~37 Hz) but if I bring it up an octave, its too high (73 Hz) and is no longer considered sub bass. In addition, the higher notes like A are as high as 109 hZ when brought up an octave. So Im kind of stuck. What range should I stay in between for good sounding sub bass? I appreciate any help in advance. :)
 

EvezDroppin

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#2
u can have notes as low as D although it doesn't going to come through this can be used for effect. but if its an upbeat track needing constant sub pressure then I'm not sure it will do the job.
D# is generally the lowest I'll use but a key of F or G (although overused) give out strong sub.
 

lostnthesound

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#3
Try other notes in the scale. Honestly, high D isn't that bad. Try following it up in with an effective low note. By doing so you'll add a nice contrast.
 

DYSRUPT

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#4
Its hard to give advice without hearing it in context but if its a short note, theres nothing wrong with removing that D note sub all together as it gives the track room to breath and adds power when the sub kicks back in.

If its a long note, try using the D and duplicate the track. On the copy, track bring out some harmonics with saturation and compression. then some chorus to widen it. then its very important to high pass and cut the sub frequencies. It won't add sub, but it keeps some low end harmonics there and also has the same effect as above, by adding power to the next sub note.

Nothing is set in stone, I would try that first. If all else fails, bring up the whole track 3 semitones. F/C instead of D/A.
 

Mania

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#6
I'd say switch between the two. High D is pretty full sounding, good for a fill or a transition bar, while low D will make the place rumble real deep, good for a drop. Make sure you give the sub harmonics so the low D can be heard on basic systems, but also a lowpass so the harmonics of the high D dont mess with the kick.
 

Zeal

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#7
If its eq'd right it should still rumble on a rig, its a hard one to call without audio tbh

- - - Updated - - -

i try not to go lower than E when making a tune though for this very reason
 

smoothassilk

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#9
If you understand chords, you can use other notes apart from the one which the orchestra is playing and make the sub-bass harmonize with the rest of it.

Here's an example:
If the chord is G major and the melody goes D-> C-> B

Your sub could go:
G -> A -> B
or
B->A->G
or
B ->C ->G

Stuff like that... just avoid clashing with the chord and with the melody note and you'll be ok.
 

logikz

I Am Not The King
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#10
did you ever think about bouncing your sub? the whole bassline, and editing each hit as you see fit. its very against the method of some producers but you have to use your brain sometimes, and sometimes you have to use your hands, and work it out. do you know what i mean?

take your sub, just the sub, and bounce it down. then EQ and compress each note. if you have a main bassline that repeats for a few times. this is an alternative. feel free to ask if you have any questions.
 

sam the dnb man

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#11
Yeah what Karl said.

If not each note, try bouncing just the high notes. This will enable you to filter any frequencies that conflict with the kick on the low notes without attenuating any of the higher notes.
To prevent the higher notes from conflicting you could try using a heavier sidechain setting with the kick and snare.
 

RUSSLA

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#12
Why not just pitch the whole song to more usable key in the first place. Remixes dont have to be in the same key.

IMO you're all making this too complicated.
 
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