My best advice for new dnb Producers.. TC

RUSSLA

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#2
Imo the only thing i'd add is most importantly for peeps starting out is they've gotta be having fun. I started DJing first and was playing clubs within a year and then kinda forced myself to 'write' tunes to hopefully be able to DJ more. Nothing happened for years cos I wasn't having fun and it wasn't till I took the pressure of myself of trying to get big did things start happening. Thats my 2 cents.

Otherwise good read for beginners deffo!
 

STLLR

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#3
Good to see the big names still pop up in these forums taking care of the little ones :D Good read!

I think it's important to add that it's best to stick to one subgenre. For example jump-up, or dubstep or neurofunk or drumstep.

I spent 5+ years producing everything I could create, electro, dubstep, drumstep, dubstep, neurofunk, dnb etc, I did everything, as a result I'm still sucky at all of them and still don't have my own sounds. Stick to one genre is the message :)
 

WhoSayReload?

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#6
How much more of a difference does it make mixing on monitors? I use my senny HD25's at the moment and a spectrum analyzer and I feel like I've got a fairly good grasp of frequencies
 

WhoSayReload?

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#7
Good read mate, I do really like the idea of using an MPC, for drums particularly being able to jam and then get those ideas down like that, whilst pretending i'm Pete Rock or Kanye West obv
 

fanu

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#17
Interesting, I would love to compare when I've got the means to upgrade!
In the same price range, there's Audio Technica M50, which have received a lot of praise. I haven't used them, but considered buying them for travel use (my main headphones are a bit on the pricey side and a bit big, so I never travel with them).
 
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