Mixdowns on a band/rock music

Discussion in 'Production' started by parsons19, Nov 30, 2012.

  1. parsons19

    parsons19 Active Member

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    Hi there guys,

    Can anyone hook me up to some place where I could learn about mixing rock music? Or maybe some of you have produced bands tracks and give me a few tips? :)

    I have a few guitary rock bits of my own and I want to actually bang them out as a finished product some day so thought it would be a good time to learn about mixdowns! I know that guitars seem to be going to the right at times and all this stuff but I really don't know the specifics!

    Cheers
     
  2. Innovine

    Innovine Active Member

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    did you try looking on the internet?
     
  3. SafeandSound

    SafeandSound Mastering Engineer

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    It all starts at the recording stage really, anything you have to do to change the sound after the original recording generally makes mixing become more like compromising. Great recordings lead to great mixes. I would buy the book written by Mike Senior Mixing Secrets For The Small Studio, it's not specific to rock but will clear up a hell of a lot of mixing do's and dont's for all genres including d&b.

    cheers

    SafeandSound Mastering
    Mastering drum and bass
     
  4. parsons19

    parsons19 Active Member

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    I actually did man! I was surprised myself but I couldn't find any specific articles on where to pan certain elements etc. Thought someone here might know :p

    And cheers SafeandSound! Will have a look
     
  5. equilibrium

    equilibrium Member

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    Safe to say you should check out the record Sing the Sorrow by AFI. The drums are mixed so perfectly and the guitar is just lush.

    Definitely look into getting Rob Papen distortion pedal. I'm a guitar player for 10+ years and when I've worked with a baller producer in the Seattle area he taught me about how to mix the stuff. I've been using RP distortion with the widening setting on at 12 degrees or "equal" and it works great.

    If you have a high level project you want to work on, you should double some guitar parts and use VOCALIGN to arrange them in time.

    Would be interested to hear what you're working on too!
     
  6. BetaFlex

    BetaFlex Member

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    I don't know of any good books off hand but have experience recording bands. Its really all to taste. Depending on what kind of rock you are talking about there are rules that apply. But often there are just a few regarding low end and mid low. all your vox and instruments above 300-500Hz are treated the same as edm cept when dealing with orchestral instruments. Your gonna need good mics (at least 5)and a good preamp and compressor. That's just for a starter recording that's decent enough to send to labels. Tell me what kind of rock and ill tell you what I know. oh and if there is any double bass (kick drum)or the bass player has a b string and goes real low.
     
  7. specter

    specter Member

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    Actually, I come from metal/rock production and only started with electronic music recently; so most of my knowledge about mixing comes from recording and mixing metal and rock stuff.

    So, if you have any specific questions I most likely can help you out.
    But some more informations and what you want to do, what you record(ed), etc. would be nice. ;)

    Regarding guitars:
    Track them at least twice, pan one track left and the other one right. A lot fo producers hardp an them to the sides; so 1 track is hard left, 1 hard right. Go easy on the distortion, especially for rock stuff. Usually you'll put a hi-pass on the guitar tracks around 100-120 Hz and a lo-pass around 12 kHz.