mixdown virgin.

IMPULSVDNB

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#1
Hi All,
New to dnbforum, but i thought id skip the newcomers thread seen as im not exactly a newbie to production, just motivationally challenged. ;).
Started production on FLSTUDIO 9. Upgraded to ableton live suite 9 about 4-5 months ago.
Im looking for some feedback about mixdowns as ive never actually got to this stage yet.
What do people do/use when mixing down with ableton? Is it worth getting an external software to do this? or is it easy enough to with ableton? Is there any tips/tricks for exporting all your audio before you bounce it back into ableton? any help will he appreciated.

looking forward to getting some tracks out there!

Cheers, IMPULSV.
 

DYSRUPT

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#3
Where you mix is a matter of preference really. All you're doing at this point is Leveling, EQing, panning, making sure every things in phase, deciding whats up front and whats not, deciding whats in the middle and whats not. quadruple checking your sub frequencies to make sure their mono, getting everything glued together nicely.



The only tip that I can think of (after mix down) make sure theres nothing on the master and you're at -6.0db. I break that rule. . . . .. cause I'm a fucking rebel hahahah or an idiot.


I do everything in Ableton except bass, My Basses start in Bitwig now. the way I see it, you can use any DAW for what ever propose, but your trying to get the same result anyways. I also chuck a limiter on the master with just a hair of gain reduction, It feels a little more glued together and adds a tiny bit more crack to the snare when I do. And I love snares on crack.
 

Optimal Prime

Specialising in the arts and crafts of Drum & Bass
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#7
Nuendo is Cubase with extra bits that 99.99% of people don't generally need as it's for use in larger broadcast type studios who deal with video and specific hardware usually more for TV and that sort of thing. It's also about twice the price. I don't know how much it has changed over the years, but it literally used to look identical.

With mixdowns the thing I tend to do is bounce each track down to audio before hand in order to a) prevent CPU overload whilst working and adding additional processing, and b) tidying the whole thing up so that it is easier to work with and view as a whole.

[edit]
And even Cubase does surround, i've done it before.
 

miszt

BASSFACE Royale
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#8
Nuendo is Cubase with extra bits that 99.99% of people don't generally need as it's for use in larger broadcast type studios who deal with video and specific hardware usually more for TV and that sort of thing. It's also about twice the price. I don't know how much it has changed over the years, but it literally used to look identical.

With mixdowns the thing I tend to do is bounce each track down to audio before hand in order to a) prevent CPU overload whilst working and adding additional processing, and b) tidying the whole thing up so that it is easier to work with and view as a whole.

[edit]
And even Cubase does surround, i've done it before.
yeah you can do surround sound with any DAW which allows 3 or more audio outputs, however nuendo was designed for surround sound from the start (or as you say, film audio), doing the same thing in ableton or cubase is a pain in the backside compared to the nuendo tool set
 

groelle

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#10
You'r first time is always terrible, but once you've done it a few times, it gets better. ;D
this. id just not care about the first mixdowns tbh. just get it somewhere where you feel comfortable and start the next tune.

chances that your sounddesign is so bad no mixing technique in the world will make your tune sound good are pretty much 100%.
 

ARTFX

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#11
Ableton Live is good enough for doing mixdowns, I actually did a tutorial video on it not so long ago on my channel.
 
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#12
Hi!! This is my first post on any forum ever and I've been producing since 2007. So it's about time. You won't find me on a google search since I have never released or sound clouded anything. Would like to start helping and being helped wherever possible

So here's where I will begin -
To the OP impulsv:

Ableton is cool. I love using it. Especially in Session View.

But I almost always bring the wav stems into a traditional sequencer like Logic or Cubase.

3 reasons for this:
1. New plugins, new ideas. Lower CPU.
2. A mixer that you can see all of your inserts more clearly. An arrange view that gives a fresh perspective.
3. I seem to get a stronger mix out of Logic compared to Ableton. Not sure if it's the sound engine or because I can get mixes sounding a lot cleaner in Logic. Although my ideas flow a lot faster in Ableton and FL Studio.

As Dysrupt said - each daw can serve a different purpose. Sometimes it is useful to use a combination.

Having said all of that. It's up to you. Rather begin to understand the principles of mixing and then it is easy to apply this to any tool you are using, inside or outside the box. Outboard gear and a million sequencers is nothing without the knowledge and the work that you put in.

Reese Witha 5poon


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 
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#13
Yeh, point taken.
Ive been working on the same tune for a few months now, and can't seem to get it any cleaner or crisper then it already is, may just wrap the structure up and post it up to get some feedback etc.

- - - Updated - - -

Yeh, point taken.
Ive been working on the same tune for a few months now, and can't seem to get it any cleaner or crisper then it already is, may just wrap the structure up and post it up to get some feedback etc.
 
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