Mid-bass EQ and rolling off

Discussion in 'Production' started by jakeshiftzw, Sep 23, 2011.

  1. jakeshiftzw

    jakeshiftzw Shiftz

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    Hey guys! Where do most of you low-cut your Mid bass? I cut mine from 220HZ onwards, just past where my Snares boosted at? Is this right?. And also, is the term 'roll off' the same as a high or low cut, just not as much? On the chan eq on logic you have the setting of being able to cut it at say -48db, so would rolling off be using the -6db setting?
     
  2. miszt

    miszt BASSFACE Royale

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    depends on the sound, i certainly wouldnt do that as a 'standard' practice, every bass patch is diffrent, every snare is diffrent. use Band-pass freq sweeps to find the highly resonant points and then take them out as you need, i usually have a few around the kick and snare area, but dont 'low cut' (hipass i think u mean) so high up, take notches out where u need, hi-pass around 100-150hz
     
  3. joncarr

    joncarr New Member

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    Agree with miszt. One thing I believe you should look at when cutting your midbass is making sure that it doesnt sound to far detached from the sub. I would aim for having your mids and sub be integral of eachother
     
  4. sam the dnb man

    sam the dnb man Variation

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    There is no right or wrong way. Just do what sounds right to you. Every person has their own aesthetic preference.
    What may sound crap to me may sound amazing to most people.
     
  5. Myron

    Myron New Member

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    I always thought that roll off meant a high or low shelf as opposed to a high or low cut - which is generally more gentle and v useful for subtle changes to balance.
     
  6. subprime

    subprime Dysjoint

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    As I understand it the -db figure is a measure of the 'slope' of the roll-off. In db per octave. So -3db slope means that the signal lowers by 3 db per octave above or below the cutoff point.
    your -48 db slope there is much more clinical, cutting 48 db per octave.

    So, every filter has a cutoff point, and a slope that measures the roll off past that cutoff point, measured in db per octave.

    I think that's right!