Metallic sounding snares?

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#6
not trying to be clever but alot of the time i would layer with something metalic sounding , eqing it so youve just got the raw tin sound you want , then layering it with a snare to give it its mid sound
 

subprime

Dysjoint
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#7
http://www.sendspace.com/file/x4kv3h

I had a play around and came up with this. Does it sound metallic like you were thinking?

The first snare is the original sample, then the processed hit, then over a couple of bars of a new WIP.

First I ran the sample thru mda overdrive, detune, ring mod and re-pshyco + Classic Reverb/Master Limiter.
Rendered.
Ran thru detune, ring mod, overdrive, eq, Freddy reverb, mda degrade and Classic Master Limiter again.

With a bit of tweaking there would be plenty of variations possible I'm sure.
 

T:M

Dusty Techno Workout
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#8
Hard to tell what you mean without an example of it. Maybe use a super-super short delay on it? Layering a snare with something that already is metallic, as Indigo said, is a nice idea too.
 
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#10
The Delay would have been advice too.
But the most important thing for a drummer is the snare. Some got more snares, because one metallic fits better in song A, another short clear in song B...

EQing and editing a snare, till it sounds really metallic and good is nearly unreachable.
Start off with your basic snare sound, maybe choose a metallic one or doublelayer two snares.
And that has nothing to do with presetting and that shit.
It's just about your "Band" and your Setup.

P.S.: Your example sounds more like an animal. Tour basic snare doesn't sound good either. Not your mistake.

KEEP IT REAL!
 

Phat_Sam

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#13
As above try all the techniques... also, im not sure if this is the technique you are goin for but sometimes (it depends on the snare sample you are using) bitcrushing can help a lot. Even if you just take the sample rate down a tad and then boost the EQ on the frequency you deem neccesary it aways creates a sort of metalic sound. Well that's on the bitcrusher I have anyway. haha.
 

Innovine

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#14
The metallic sound in a real snare hit comes from the drumstick striking the rim of the snare at the same time. This causes the shell of the drum to ring out. Even if your snare hit goes 'crack!', the metallic tones i think you are looking for come more from the rimshot 'clanggg'. You can best recreate something like this on a synth using FM, and layer it with your regular snare hit and adjust the envelope to taste, a longish release will sound natural. Alternatively, layer a nice rimshot sample in there.
 

RUSSLA

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#15
Hmm imo i'd just start with a decent sample first instead of spending hours tryin to recreate something that you can just add in to start with. Many big prodcuers say you should start with a high quality clip first, then process that to your taste. Makes a lot more sence to me..
 

motion audio

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#16
Hmm imo i'd just start with a decent sample first instead of spending hours tryin to recreate something that you can just add in to start with. Many big prodcuers say you should start with a high quality clip first, then process that to your taste. Makes a lot more sence to me..
:applause: You cant emphasize something thats not there in the first place.

If its sounding nearly there then layering with another hit can work nicely, but if its nowhere near then look for a better sample.

Cymbals hits with a short decay can give a snare a bit more of a crisp sound, need to be kept fairly low though, easy to over do it.
 
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