Mastering and audio wavforms

Discussion in 'Production' started by UKDNB, Feb 17, 2011.

  1. UKDNB

    UKDNB Member

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    Hi all,
    i am looking to start a course in mastering etc this year, but would like to do some preliminary reading.

    is there any books etc available which teach you the details of waveform and what youre looking at and how to determine whats going on in the waveform?

    thanks

    Stu
     
  2. ruksi

    ruksi Member

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    Check out 'Mastering Audio: The Art and the Science' by Bob Katz
     
  3. kama

    kama benkama.net

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    +1
     
  4. SafeandSound

    SafeandSound Mastering Engineer

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    Hi there, the book recommendation is good.

    However I would quickly forget what waveforms look like as a guidance on how anything sounds.

    Fact: To master successfully you must hear what is in an audio file for yourself on accurate full range monitors in a
    room that has been treated for an accurate frequency response and stereo image.

    cheers
     
  5. kama

    kama benkama.net

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    Mastering is also nothign to jump into. It's a very difficult task and you need definitive knowledge of many areas. You should have at least some degree of knowledge of production and how the things you are mastering were made. What's even more important - and even harder to master - is the understanding of how different processors (like compressors and EQ's) work.

    You need a measured and acoustically treated, neutral room as a listening environment, an excellent monitoring system and quality processors and the understanding of how to use them. This all costs very much and you need a lot of practice to make the most of these tools.

    I'm not trying to put you down, but it is a huge task to learn this all. You'd be better off trying to get an internship at an established studio so you can learn the basics first if you're a beginner and have no knowledge of the area. It's not something you learn from books, it's something you learn by listening.